Questions d'équité

Multiculturalism and Citizenship are complements, not opposites

Irene Bloemraad, Berkeley
Guest Contributor

Attacking multiculturalism has become a political cliché.

Last October, when German Chancellor Angela Merkel proclaimed that a multicultural approach had “utterly failed” in Germany, she echoed a commonly-heard sentiment across Europe.  Just last month, British Prime Minister David Cameron indicted his country’s decades-old policy of multiculturalism for failing to promote a sense of common identity, and for encouraging Muslim...

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Beyond ‘beads and feathers’: Indigenous knowledge and pedagogies

María del Carmen Rodriguez de France, University of Victoria
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Issues Portfolio’s ‘Transforming the Academy: Indigenous Education’ series, which will be the focus of the Portfolio’s programming at Congress 2011.

“My hope emerges from those places of struggle where I witness individuals positively transforming their lives and the world around them,” writes bell hooks. “Educating is always a vocation rooted in hopefulness. As teachers we believe that learning is possible, that nothing can keep an open mind from seeking after...

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Change demanded, celebrated on International Women's Day 2011

Jane Arscott, Athabasca University
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Portfolio’s series marking the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day.

March 8, 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day (IWD).The United Nations has declared the theme for the centenary as, ‘Equal access to education, training and science and technology: Pathway to decent work for women.’

In Canada, the majority (57%) agrees that much remains to be done to achieve gender equality. Moreover,...

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Canadian multiculturalism and social inclusion

Tania Das Gupta, York University
Guest Contributor

According to a recent international survey of Europe and North America, Canada is ranked among the world’s top countries in terms of the integration of immigrants. High marks were given to its multicultural model, especially in how it has been implemented through the educational system. This assessment corresponds with what new immigrants tell researchers about why they chose Canada as their future home – its reputation for policies and programs that enhanced a socially inclusive citizenship in an increasingly diverse...

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Life and death of Canada's founding languages (and not the two you think)

Onowa McIvor, University of Victoria
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Issues Portfolio’s ‘Transforming the Academy: Indigenous Education’ series, which will be the focus of the Portfolio’s programming at Congress 2011.

Most Indigenous languages in the land now called Canada are on the decline. I have seen the language die in my family in one generation through the premature deaths of both my maternal grandparents. My grandparents chose not to pass their language Muskego-Nîhîyaw (...

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Canada's great national itch: Debating multiculturalism

Phil Ryan, Carleton University
Guest Contributor

“Whether we like it or not – and there’s not much to like – events could force a national debate on whether multiculturalism is working in Canada.” One of the two triggering events to which the February 11, 2011 Globe and Mail article by John Ibbitson pointed occurred in Winnipeg where, he wrote:

…a dozen newly-arrived families are demanding from the public school board that their children be exempted from compulsory classes in music and phys-ed, claiming that music and mixing genders are forbidden in their interpretation of Islam.

This is a provocative...

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‘I’m Métis: What’s your excuse?’: On the optics and misrecognition of Métis in Canada

Chris Andersen, University of Alberta
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Issues Portfolio’s ‘Transforming the Academy: Indigenous Education’ series, which will be the focus of the Portfolio’s programming at Congress 2011.

As a kid, I spent my formative years growing up in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. In addition to the numerous visits to family living north of the city, we used to attend “Back to Batoche,” an annual Métis celebration held adjacent to the historic battleground...

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Beyond multiculturalism: Reclaiming tolerance and human judgment

Frank Furedi, University of Kent
Guest Contributor

At a security conference in Munich earlier this month, British prime minister David Cameron mistakenly argued that tolerance was responsible for the failure of multiculturalism. “Frankly, we need a lot less of the passive tolerance of recent years and much more active, muscular liberalism,” he said. However, Cameron shouldn’t blame the problems of multiculturalism on tolerance.

What is ‘passive tolerance’? Tolerance is anything but passive. Tolerance requires courage, conviction and a commitment to freedom – key...

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Indigenous knowledge, symbolic literacy and the 1764 Treaty at Niagara

Lynn Gehl, York University
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Issues Portfolio’s ‘Transforming the Academy: Indigenous Education’ series, which will be the focus of the Portfolio’s programming at Congress 2011.

Kwey Kwey; Mnakinag ndoodem.  Pikwàkanagàn n´doonjiba.  Peterborough megwa ndidaa.  Giizhigaate-Mnidoo-kwe ndizhinikaaz. Nda zhaaganaashii noozwin Lynn Gehl.

It was in the year 1764 when the Treaty at Niagara took place.  This event served to ratify the...

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Indigenizing university administration or Tâwaw cî? (Take 2)

Jo-Ann Episkenew, University of Regina
Guest Contributor

This blog post is part of the Federation Equity Issues Portfolio’s ‘Transforming the Academy: Indigenous Education’ series, which will be the focus of the Portfolio’s programming at Congress 2011.

Iskwêw ka-wasaka pîkiswêt niya. Kishchee tey mo’yawn aen li Michif wi’yan. My name is Woman Who Speaks for the Circle, and I am proud to be Métis.

Several years ago my friend Deanna Reder and I made a presentation to the Chairs of English Departments in Canada.  Our...

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