juillet 2011

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News from the Social Sciences and Humanities community

Ryan Saxby Hill
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

There were a few interesting pieces of news floating around that we thought readers of the Fedcan blog might be interested in. Enjoy!

It looks like the tides are shifting in the debate over how to best deliver copyrighted material to students on campus. Michael Geist argues in the Toronto Star that Universities are starting to embrace technological alternatives to the photocopy levy offered through Access Copyright. [Toronto Star]

Dale Kirby points to the interesting finding in a recent report from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario that adults with higher literacy levels are three times more likely to participate in adult learning. [...

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Ethnic Studies, Pluralism and Democracy

Christine Sleeter, California State University Monterey Bay
This blog entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series on ‘interculturalism and pluralism’.

In a multicultural society, is ethnic studies separatist? Is it harmful to students? Does ethnic studies threaten social unity? Is ethnic studies academically weak? I often hear these questions answered in the affirmative to justify eliminating various forms of ethnic studies curricula, or not allowing ethnic studies to be established in the first place. But objections to ethnic studies actually fly in the face of the research evidence.

Before...

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(Some of) What I learned at Worldviews

Ryan Saxby Hill
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Our good friends at the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations organized a great series of discussions at the first annual Worldviews Conference on the Media and Higher Education. There were some great conversations about how the media and higher education interact, and how perhaps we could do more to improve that relationship. There was far too much going on over the three days for a one-post blog summary, but here are a few links and things that I found particularly interesting.

There is a (somewhat) vibrant specialist media concerned with higher education – Although it’s less likely that your city’s daily paper has a higher education reporter these days (or a beat reporter for anything for that matter), there is a niche media that covers topics of...

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Gender, disability and urban life in Montréal

Laurence Parent, RAPLIQ
This entry is part of a collaborative series on disabilities between the Federation’s Equity Issues Portfolio and the Canadian Disability Studies Association/ Association Canadienne des Études sur l’Incapacité.

In 2009, I co-founded Regroupement des activistes pour l’inclusion au Québec (RAPLIQ) – a disability rights organization – and began networking with many disabled individuals who were open to talking about their everyday experiences living in Montréal. I quickly realized that we were all similarly having difficulties talking...

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Eugenics and contemporary disability studies

Natalie Ball, University of Calgary

This entry is part of a collaborative series on disabilities between the Federation’s Equity Issues Portfolio and the Canadian Disability Studies Association/ Association Canadienne des Études sur l’Incapacité.

People with disabilities often were targeted by the state for eugenic intervention. Such policies and practices continue to impact the lives of people with disabilities. The word ‘eugenics’ often invokes thoughts of forced sexual sterilization mandated by a governing body. It recalls to mind 19th and 20th...

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‘Stand Up’for Exclusion?: Queer Pride, ableism and inequality

Danielle Peers, University of Alberta and Lindsay Eales, University of Alberta

This entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series featuring Trudeau Fellows and Trudeau Scholars. It is Pride Week in Edmonton, as we write this. Our city’s billboards are wrapped with rainbow-colored posters of young scantily-clad men with bulging… muscles.  Unfortunately, we have come to expect a significant dose of ableism, ageism, racism and fatphobia at Pride festivals across North America...

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Soft Sovereignties and Strokes of Genius: Situating the Indigenous Humanities within Canada

Len M. Findlay, University of Saskatchewan

This entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series on Indigenizing the academy and Indigenous education.

Canadian Literature is now so well recognized domestically and internationally that both CanLit, and the notion of recognition itself, can be interrogated outside the binary of dismissal and hype:  that is to say, dismissal by the mother country and the ‘proper’ guardians of the mother tongue versus uncritical promotion by cultural nationalists in the former British colony. Such...

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Big Thinking Podcast: Double Diepeveen and shiny things edition

Photo courtesy joshuaseye on Flickr.

Will the real modernity please stand up? This episode of the Big Thinking podcast delves into the world of modernity, skepticism, fraud and satire. Leonard Diepeveen of Dalhousie University talks about his research on the emergence of striking new art, bored soldiers writing fake avant garde verse, and parodies of Gertrude Stein – and what that reveals about modernity and society, even today. Plus, we get a sneak preview of Len’s explorations – with Timothy van Laar of the University of Illinois – of all things shiny.

[podcast]...

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