février 2012

Archives

Homonationalist Discourse, Queer Organizing and the Media

Fatima Jaffer, University of British Columbia
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the CFHSS’s VP Equity Issues series on issues related to LGBTQI2-S (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, questioning, intersex and Two-Spirited) peoples.

Media stories build on tropes and themes familiar to readers. Such tropes and themes act as a shorthand or ‘common sense’ of what we, as readers, are assumed to believe or are likely to accept. I would argue that in Canada these tropes haven’t changed much since Confederation, although they have varied in form over time and space. Historically these tropes – of...

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Registration for our March Big Thinking lecture is now open. On March 8, Alex Sevigny of McMaster University will lecture on political communication, particularly around Question Period and social media. Over the weekend, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) held their annual meeting in Canada for the first time in about 30 years. While AAAS content is not specific to HSS disciplines, David VanderZwaag, a Canada Research Chair in Ocean Law and Governance, discussed ways in which climate change can affect Canada’s laws on shipping regulation, ocean governance and marine biodiversity protection. In another example of Canadian humanities contributions...

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Indigenous Peoples, Colonialism and Ballet-Slipper Socks: Telling Stories and Storytelling

Jocelyn Thorpe, Memorial University
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series on Indigenizing the academy and Indigenous education.

Our daughter rarely wore the pink ballet-slipper socks she received when she was born. My partner couldn’t stand them, finding in those socks every limitation ever imposed upon a girl. But I hung onto them, unable to give away newborn socks that actually stayed on newborn feet. Two-and-a-half years later, those socks have made a reappearance, this time on the feet of our...

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How (not) to do Queer Studies in the classroom: Teaching to think beyond tolerance

Christopher Smith, University of Toronto
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the CFHSS’s VP Equity Issues series on issues related to LGBTQI2-S (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, questioning, intersex and Two-Spirited) peoples.

In the fall of 2010, I was invited by the Association for Media Literacy (AML) to facilitate a workshop that explored the potential and fruitful relationship between Queer theory and media literacy. Understanding that queer theory can often be untranslatable outside of...

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Two of our 2011 Big Thinkers are in the news this week. Our September Big Thinker, Evan Fraser, was featured on The Cord in an article on the effects of climate change. Kwame Anthony Appiah, a Big Thinker from our Congress 2011 line-up, was presented with the 2011 National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

Martha Nussbaum, a professor of law and ethics at the University of Chicago, gave a lecture at Stanford University on the importance of the humanities...

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Black History Month and Paradoxes of Narrating the Nation: Black-Mi'kmaq Relations

Paula Madden, University of Sussex
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the VP Equity series on Black History Month in Canada.

Black History Month is an interesting time of year. All across the country African Canadians celebrate their achievements. They assert their belonging and an equal claim to the project that we call Canada based on their many contributions to building Canada and also for their length of tenure. The stories of Black Pioneers are shared and Black participation in wars such as the War of...

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Nouvelles des sciences humaines

Milena Stanoeva

Fédération canadienne des sciences humaines

La Fédération canadienne des sciences humaines (FCSH) a publié la liste des finalistes pour le Prix du Canada en sciences humaines et le Prix du Canada en sciences sociales. Cette année, les finalistes s’intéressent à des sujets variés, de la Russie postsoviétique au Toronto des années 1960. Les lauréats seront annoncés à l’occasion d’une cérémonie qui se tiendra le 30 mars 2012 au Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal dans le cadre de l’assemblée générale annuelle de la FCSH. La liste des finalistes ainsi que le communiqué de presse officiel se trouvent ici. Si vous avez manqué la causerie Voir grand de Jeremy de Beer sur l’innovation et la propriété intellectuelle la semaine dernière,...

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Teaching With Conflict and Controversial Issues in Diverse and Multicultural Classrooms

Christina Parker, OISE/University of Toronto Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the collaborative series on education and equity between the CFHSS’s Equity Issues Portfolio and the Canadian Society for the Study of Education.

At its core, multicultural education is about facilitating inclusion among diverse students. It equitably engages diverse students in its content and pedagogy and it is reflective of students’ own perspectives, histories, and identities. Multicultural education critically acknowledges race,...

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Gender Equality 40-Years after the Royal Commission on the Status of Women

Malinda S. Smith, Vice President, Equity Issues Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

This past Saturday’s Globe and Mail included a story by Jane Taber entitled “Re-paving the way for women on the Hill…yet again.” In the article, Laurin Li, a 21-year old McGill University joint major in History and Cultural Studies student and recently elected parliamentarian who swept in to office in the Orange Wave in Quebec, states: “I think it will last throughout my...

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Innovation? What innovation? Re-thinking progress and how we measure it

CHFSS kicked off the Winter 2012 Big Thinking series on January 31 with Professor Jeremy de Beer from the University of Ottawa. Held in partnership with the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), the event drew over 150 MPs, Senators and public servants, as well as many university presidents who were in town as part of AUCC’s Day on the Hill.

Prof. de Beer’s talk, Innovation? What innovation? Re-thinking progress and how we measure it, explored new options for considering intellectual property and how policies can best encourage new, creative research. He argued for a more holistic approach to innovation, one that values the contributions of the social sciences and humanities, while also challenging the ways we traditionally measure...

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Nouvelles des sciences humaines

Milena Stanoeva
Fédération canadienne des sciences humaines

La première causerie Voir Grand de la saison a eu lieu mardi dernier. Jeremy de Beer, professeur de droit à l’Université d’Ottawa, a présenté des façons de repenser la propriété intellectuelle et la mesure de l’innovation. Dans son exposé, de Beer a soutenu l’importance d’une approche plus holistique de l’innovation, qui reconnaîtrait la contribution des sciences humaines et reposerait sur des mesures diversifiées en plus des mesures économiques. Un résumé de la causerie a été publié sur le blogue En marge d’Affaires universitaires. iPolitics a aussi parlé de l’événement; ses membres peuvent lire l’article au http://www.ipolitics.ca/2012/01/31/...

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Canada’s Black Writers: Achieving Excellence and Avoiding Annihilation

Zetta Elliott, Borough of Manhattan Community College
Guest Contributor

Last summer, after returning from a cross-border trip to Toronto, a friend of mine asked: “What’s wrong with Canada?” It’s a question she and I have considered over the years as we’ve worked to establish ourselves as black women writers and scholars. Rosamond is a poet/performance artist/activist. I met her in graduate school at New York University, where she wrote her dissertation on Caribbean immigrant literature, including texts by Canadian authors Dionne Brand and...

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