mars 2012

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Image courtesy of vapourtrails on Flickr

The winners of the 2012 Canada Prizes were announced today at a ceremony in Montreal's Musée des beaux-arts. Congratulations to Susan R. Fisher, Louise Vigneault, Veronica Strong-Boag and Michel Ducharme. The official press release, along with information on the winning works, is available here.

In light of the current context, Canada’s research community received some good news in the 2012 Federal Budget. Amongst a host of measures, the Economic Action Plan proposes new investments to promote research...

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Record wrote about Congress earlier this week. In particular, the article discusses the trail festival, which will be held on May 25 as a way of celebrating Kitchener-Waterloo’s trails and welcoming congress-goers with live music, crafts, tours and talks. Times Higher Education featured an article on the rise of the number of...

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Privilege vs. Complicity: People of Colour and Settler Colonialism

Beenash Jafri, York University
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the Equity Issues Portfolio’s series on Indigenizing the academy and Indigenous education.

March 21st marks the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It is a day to commemorate lives lost during the 1960 Sharpeville Massacre, and to reflect on our contemporary efforts to challenge racism and colonialism. In the spirit of this day, I would like to contribute to the ongoing Equity...

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Guardian’s Higher Education Network featured a guest article by David Phipps of Research Impact. In this first in a series of four article, Phipps explains what knowledge mobilization is and why it is important for academics to find ways beyond the academic journal to communicate their findings to the public.

The Guardian also featured an article by Matt Batstone, director of Britain’s New College of the Humanities, arguing that, contrary to popular belief, humanities graduates do very well professionally and take up leadership positions in all spheres of...

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LGBT Struggles for Human Dignity and Equal Rights in Uganda

Val Kalende, Episcopal Divinity School

Guest Contributor This entry is part of the CFHSS’s VP Equity Issues series on issues related to LGBTQI2-S (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, questioning, intersex and Two-Spirited) peoples.

The influence of the Christian Right on LGBT rights continues to spread beyond the United States. It is productive to examine the nature and impact of this influence on the African continent. As a Ugandan lesbian who grew up in an evangelical Christian household, I think it is...

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Big Thinking: Alex Sévigny on CBC

Photo courtesy Marcio Cabral de Moura

On March 8, Alex Sévigny, Program Director in the McMaster-Syracuse Master of Communications Management program at McMaster University, came to Ottawa as part of CFHSS' Big Thinking lecture series on Parliament Hill. His lecture, Who's driving the story? Question Period, social media and changing political communications, was attended by over 100 MPs, Senators, business and not-for-profit folk--look for the video of his talk up on our site shortly. Before heading up to the Hill to give the breakfast lecture, Alex...

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Alex Sévigny, director of McMaster University’s Master of Communications Management Program, presented his Big Thinking lecture, “Who's driving the story? Question period, social media, and changing political communications,” to a full house yesterday. We will be making a video of his lecture available shortly.

And keep an eye out for our next Big Thinking lecture featuring Janice Keefe of Mount Saint Vincent University, who will be talking about the challenges Canada will face as its population ages in the coming decades. Registration is now open.

Harvey Weingarten, president of the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, gave a talk at the 2012 Symposium of the Ontario Research Chairs...

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Status of Black Women in the Academy on International Women’s Day

Njoki N. Wane, University of Toronto
Guest contributor

“Despite some notable progress in the past decade towards greater diversity, the Canadian academy remains largely white and male,” according to a recent CAUT Educational Review. Further, the 2006 “Census data shows an ongoing underrepresentation of women, First Nations, and visible minority professors, as well as significant earnings and unemployment gaps for many of these groups.”

...

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Big Thinking Podcast: The sexy edition

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Karen Diepeveen and I had the pleasure of interviewing Jennifer V. Evans, an associate professor of history at Carleton University, for the Big Thinking podcast. In the interest of transparency, I admit that I took her Social History of Sexuality class in 3rd year and loved it!

Evans’ research focuses on 20th century Germany and issues of sexuality. Her new book, Life Among the Ruins: Cityscape and Sexuality in Cold War Berlin examines the re-emergence of the city’s subcultures in the post-World War II period.

Tune in to hear us talk sexuality, systems of power, forms of resistance and Valentine’s Day.

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News from the social sciences and humanities

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Léo Charbonneau blogs this week on the recent boycott of academic publishing company Elsevier, which owns 2,000 academic journals, by researchers. The boycott was over Elsevier’s support of the Research Works Act, a US legislation proposal that would prohibit open access mandates for federal research funding. In both Canada and the US, government organizations that provide public funding for research require that the research be made publicly available. More than 7,500 researchers worldwide vowed to stop sending their research to Elsevier-owned journals, leading the company to withdraw its support for the legislation.

Charbonneau’s blog post also makes the interesting point that, although peer-reviewed journal articles are seen as the only authoritative...

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Resisting Invisibility: Black faculty in Art and Art History in Canada

Charmaine Nelson, McGill University
Guest Contributor

This entry is part of the VP Equity Issues series on Black History Month in Canada.

As Black History Month draws to a close and Women’s History Month begins, I am reminded of the importance of my identity as a black female scholar. More specifically, I am a rare breed of Canadian academic, a black female art historian. At the most recent meeting of the Universities Art Association of Canada (UAAC) annual...

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