juillet 2012

Archives

Differently Abled: The Brave New World of Techno/Cyborg Sports and Culture

Caitlin Stone Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

In my opinion, what makes disability studies such a unique discipline is its emphasis on storytelling and the experience of disability. As one of the few academic disciplines which values the intimate personal stories of individuals and the collective (much like Women’s Studies and History to name a few), disability studies can inform academic work in an enriched way that theory alone cannot.

This unique aspect of disability studies was beautifully illustrated by Roxanne Mykitiuk and Eliza Chandler in their digital storytelling project, which they presented during the first of two panels on equity and disability that took place at Congress 2012. Accompanied by presentations from Jennifer Rowsell and...

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News from the social sciences and humanities: Humanities, political science and graphic novels

 

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Alan Liu, founder of 4Humanities, argues that the humanities are essential for a culture that values discovery, innovation and technological advancement as much as we do. He argues that we need to understand the social, ethical and cultural shifts surrounding advancement in technology and science in order to truly be innovative and responsive to a shifting world.

An editorial published in Nature counters the United...

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Rethinking Creativity and Innovation from a Disability Studies Perspective

Caitlin Stone Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Disability is often seen as a condition that requires a solution. Growing up with a sibling living with a physical disability, I can clearly recall the long rides to numerous doctors’ appointments. For years, I watched my younger sister get prodded, poked, examined, photographed, and scanned by various medical professionals.

In the second of two equity panels on disability and culture, Tanya Titchkosky, Michael J. Prince, and Rod Michalko explored how disability studies challenges the common conception of what it means to be human. Collectively, the three presentations deconstructed ableism as a cultural concept, and challenged the audience to re-vision their understanding of ability.

...

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Dignity, Equality, Freedom: The Charter 30 Years On

Caitlin Stone Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

On May 28, I attended the first equity panel in the series sponsored by the Equity and Diversity Portfolio at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Later, as I re-read the pages of notes I took during the panel, I realized how many questions I had which had been left unanswered. To say that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms is a complex piece of legislation is a gross understatement. Thankfully, I’ve completed some of my undergraduate course work on the Charter and I was familiar with the relevant case law that was referenced by the panelists – don’t worry, I have no intention of delving into that sort of detail here. Instead I’ll discuss my particular interest in Carissima Mathen’s analysis of equality and...

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News from the social sciences and humanities: Census, open access and university graduates

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Vass Bednar and Mark Stabile wrote an op-ed for the Vancouver Sun on the effects that cuts to Statistics Canada will have on policy-making. They argue that making sound policy decisions for the future is impossible without accurate measures of present challenges and national well-being.

The United Kingdom announced that it will make government-funded research completely open access by 2014. The research will be available from anywhere in the world at no charge. While some British...

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News from the social sciences and humanities: Death of Evidence, copyright and funding cuts

 

Milena Stanoeva Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

On Tuesday, thousands of scientists descended on Parliament Hill to hold a mock funeral for the death of evidence. They were protesting funding cuts to important research programs, as well as the Harper government’s limitations on the ability of government-funded scientists to speak to the public. You can read our summary of the protest here, as well as Léo Charbonneau’s analysis of the event over at Margin Notes.

Smaro Kamboureli, Canada Research...

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No science, no evidence, no truth, no democracy: Canada’s science community speaks out

Milena Stanoeva
Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Around a thousand members of Canada’s science community held a memorial service today for evidence-based decision-making on Parliament Hill.  Supported by the Council of Canadians, the “Death of Evidence” protest, which included a procession through downtown Ottawa and “eulogies” delivered by scientists from across the country, was in response to cuts to important research programs, like the Experimental Lakes Area, the end of the mandatory long-form census, as well as the Harper government’s policy of limiting government-funded researchers’ ability to speak publicly about their research.

Many of the speakers emphasized the importance of scientific research to...

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