mai 2014

Archives

The workplace and labour studies face a challenging future

Doug Junke

Despite hard-fought gains over the years, the Canadian labour movement knows that it is not a time to stand still and be complacent.

That was evident at the Canadian Association for Work and Labour Studies (CAWLS) plenary session at Congress 2014 on Thursday, entitled “The past, present and future of work and labour studies.”

In her wide-ranging talk, Stephanie Ross, founding president of CAWLS and a political science professor at York University, said there “has been a real thirst for progressive research” but that it has been “a struggle to get labour studies into universities and to keep them there.”

Joining Ross on the panel were Bryan Palmer of Trent University and Winnie Ng of Ryerson University.

Ross said that existing university programs – many developed in the 1960s at a time of rank and file...

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The gift of life

Terry Soleas

"Blood can bring out the best of human virtues, our basest urges and some of the worst in humanity.” Lawrence Hill, a celebrated and acclaimed Canadian author was at Congress on Thursday, May 29 to deliver one of his Massey Series of Lectures on the topic of blood’s place in society, based on his bestseller Blood, the Stuff of Life.

Hill, a celebrated writer of both fiction and non-fiction stated early in his lecture that “There is much to unite those write fiction & those who write non-fiction”. He also quipped that when he told his mother that he was delivering a Big Thinking lecture she asked him ”That’s great Larry, but why you?”

On the topic of blood’s place in society, Hill stated that it holds a central dichotomy in the human psyche as blood can embody the best of humankind as often as it can manifest in the worst of human...

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Mayors for a better Canada

Jessica Dixon

True to my age, a cynical perspective regarding the effectiveness of Canada’s democratic structure flows through my veins. With this in mind, I attended American Professor, Benjamin Barber’s presentation (and the following panel) about the message of his new book If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities. This Big Thinking session forced me to reconsider whether it is democracy itself that is malfunctioning, or the people involved.

“Citizens tend to trust their elected city officials more than those occupying federal positions” Barber began, outlining the issues with those in parliament being so far removed from the public, “Surprisingly, Rob...

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The towers in the world, the worlds in the towers

Samara Bissonnette

HIGHRISE. An incredibly modern, collaborative, inspiring digital project connecting voices from high rise buildings all over the world. These big concrete mammoths of architecture are "containers of human experience", and this interactive web documentary allows users to discover "the towers in the world, and the worlds in the towers".

The National Film Board, with an extensive team of researchers, creators, academics, digital artists, volunteers and high rise residents, has made the idea of one Katerina Cizek come to life in a project called Highrise that has successfully challenged and reinvented the language of storytelling.

In this...

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The Robin Hood of academics - open access publishing debate series

Samara Bissonnette

In "Open Access and the future of academic publishing", the second installment of a three part debate series on copyright and the modern academic, Glen Rollan and Michale Geist attacked the highly controversial academic subject of open access publication. Once upon a time, open access - defined here as free and accessible sources for the masses - was the dominant means of publication. Since then however, academic sources have become harder for authors to publish and in turn, harder for the average reader to access. In the last few years, there has been an on-going struggle to bring back open access...

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Feeding the future: A Canadian standoff

Terry Soleas

Genome Canada presented a draft brief that they have been refining as a part of their GE3LS (Genomics and its Ethical, Environmental, Economic, Legal and Social aspects) Series at Congress 2014 entitled  “Feeding the Future: Can Scientists, Regulators and Activists agree?”. Genome Canada is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2000 to administer and foster large-scale genomics research in Canada. Thus far, Genome Canada has invested...

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A new imagination - Catherine Dauvergne and the new politics of immigration

Samara Bissonnette

In an installment of the Big Thinking series for Congress 2014, Catherine Dauvergne delivered one of her newest big ideas yesterday at Brock University in a presentation titled "The End of Settler Societies and the New Politics of Immigration". As a member of The Trudeau Foundation, which was founded in 2001 in tribute to the humanitarian virtues of Pierre Trudeau himself, Dauvergne acts as a pro-bono lawyer, a teacher, and a student of research herself, as she researches a new understanding of the politics of immigration around the world, with particular attention to our Canadian home. As a professor, she imparts advice and assistance to young scholars in her field and maintains the belief that "to really do justice to a big idea, you need time more than anything else", to which she added that "the Trudeau Foundation is a gift of time" to her...

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Being the best research assistant you can be

Terry Soleas

Dr. Michelle McGinn in an extension of her role as the Associate Dean of Research and International Initiatives led a workshop on helping research assistants deepen their engagement with the research process, improve their skillset as well as improve their marketability. The workshop began with a reflective exercise to determine what each attendee knew, wanted to know, and had learned.

Those present participated in case studies, interactive discussions and collaborative activities to explore some common dilemmas, challenges and opportunities often faced by research assistants. The groups then nominated one member to present their group findings.

Being a research assistant, I found the workshop extremely helpful. Some common themes included discussions of what research assistants do, what are the benefits...

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Real world plot-lines and violent media

Jessica Dixon

As a member of the media-obsessed public, I take pride in my expansive knowledge regarding technological developments and other forms of media produced by our digital culture. I have grown up with the re-enforced idea that this mind-set is a good one to have; however, critical-thinker Rose Dyson has dared to ask the question: “is it?”

On Wednesday, May 28 Brock University’s Schmon Tower Boardroom was filled with eager listeners as Dyson gave a keynote address for the Canadian Peace Research Association (CPRA) entitled “Peace building in a digital age”. Focusing on the implications surrounding the over-consumption of violent media, Dyson examined...

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Russian anti-gay legislation sparks critical thought--Sochi and beyond

Liz Smith

Recent events in Russia are certainly at the forefront of a number of important geopolitical conversations. Things that might stand out include: the detaining of the 'Arctic 30' Greenpeace activists, granting temporary asylum to American whistleblower Edward Snowden, as well as the recent military intervention in the 2014 Ukrainian Revolution. Of course, the international spectacle of the 2014 Olympic Winter Games was, indeed, on the public radar, and Putin's enactment of the so-called 'anti-gay propaganda law' immediately before the Sochi Opening Ceremonies caught the attention of the masses. It was this topic that constituted the framework for a vibrant discussion by a roundtable of political and historical experts at Sunday night's Congress panel put on by the Canadian Historical Association (CHA), entitled "...

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Challenging casual homophobia

Liz Smith

How often do you hear “That’s so gay”? What about “faggot”, “dyke”, and “queer”? Here’s a less comfortable question: how often do you yourself use these words? While terms like these permeate our language, they are seldom challenged let alone recognized as a significant part of our popular discourse. Perpetuating this language without rigorous consideration of the connotations it holds is part of what enables a culture of ‘casual homophobia’—something that characterizes our contemporary society, even at times below our level of conscious awareness, and which has detrimental effects for sexual minorities.

Dr. Kristopher Wells, Director of the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services at the University of Alberta (iSMSS), and Wade Davis, former...

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David Plotz – Digital journalism: From scourge to trend-setter

Doug Junke

For David Plotz, the advent of digital journalism has been the best of times and the worst of times, to borrow from Charles Dickens.

Slate editor Plotz addressed Tuesday’s Congress 2014 Big Thinking crowd of 125 at Brock University with his engaging speech, “Fast, cheap and out of control: How the Internet has made journalism  better than it’s ever been.”

But by way of background first, Plotz grew up and still lives in Washington, D.C., graduated from Harvard in 1992 and has been a writer with Slate – an online current affairs and culture magazine -- since its inception in 1996, becoming editor in 2008. Slate has won two U.S. National Magazine Awards.

He has published two books: The Genius Factory and Good Book.

Plotz got his start in journalism by being rejected by 91 out of 92 newspapers to...

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This scientist has been government approved for your safety

Jessica Dixon

Franke James, James Turk, and Dr. Janet Friskney came together within Brock University's David S. Howes Theatre yesterday to speak out against issues that they think should have the Harper Government shaking in their government-endorsed boots. “Eroding democracy: Canada's public science policy in a new regime of governance” addressed the many issues currently found within Canada’s deteriorating democracy.

“There are three warning signs that democracy is at risk in Canada” commented Franke James, author and artist of environmental book Banned on the Hill, “One- The...

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Votre attention... futurs consommateurs

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Un jour, le magasinage ne sera pas associé à une foule hostile et compacte comme c’est actuellement le cas, affirme Brian Greenspan, directeur de l’Hyperlab de la Carleton University. M. Greenspan et ses étudiants se penchent sur les conséquences d’une culture de type « Big Brother » qui surviennent inévitablement lorsqu’on vit sur un nuage informatique. Dans ce balado, le chercheur guide les auditeurs à travers les dédales d’un centre commercial de l’avenir, décrivant comment les commerçants...

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Child minding at Congress – Keeping the kids involved

Doug Junke

When it comes to Congress 2014, it’s not all about the adults. There’s a child-minding service for participants’ children as well.

“It’s been a great experience,” says Marie Reimer, Brock University’s special projects and operations co-ordinator. “I’m working with excellent people who are putting the university in the spotlight, Congress 2014 and the Federation (for the Humanities and Social Sciences) as well.”

And the kids?

“The children are responding really well … they seem to be enjoying themselves…. And we’ve had a good response from the parents,” said Reimer.

Thirty-one children of Congress participants were pre-registered for the child-minding service, ranging in age from eight months to 12 years. They...

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The final five SSHRC Storytellers selected

Liz Smith

Important and fascinating research in 3 minutes or less. READY. GO! Out of roughly 150 submissions, the top twenty-five postsecondary students from across Canada gathered at the Congress Centre Expo Event Space yesterday to showcase their diverse research projects in the second annual Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) “Research for a Better Life: The Storytellers” challenge. The aim? To convey the relevance and importance of their SSHRC-funded research, each covering a different societal issue, through a compelling story in a 3 minute segment.

“This initiative is part of a larger ambition to showcase how SSHRC research is helping us understand the world around us towards a better future”, said the keynote speaker.

The success of the Storytellers initiative to pitch a diversity of...

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Apprendre par les chiffres

La recherche menée à la Wilfred Laurier University propose de nouvelles façons d’enseigner les mathématiques aux enfants

Malorie Bertrand, Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Au Canada, près de 40 pour cent des adultes n’ont pas les compétences de base en lecture requises pour fonctionner adéquatement en société et la moitié ne possèdent pas les compétences minimales en mathématiques. Or, des études ont démontré que les personnes qui ont de faibles compétences...

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Superstition on the battlefield: The culture of death among Canadian soldiers in WWI

Terry Soleas

Tim Cook, a renowned Canadian Historian of the First World War, spoke today at the Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities at Brock University. His lecture, “The borders between life and death: Stories of the supernatural and uncanny among Canada’s Great War soldiers“ discussed the superstition of soldiers and their relationship with death. Cook explained that he would be discussing the supernatural through the eyes of a historian. 

Soldiers in World War I fought in trenches that were subject to mortar bombardment, gassing, machine gun fire, and frequent incursions by enemy troops. These trenches were also subject to rampant pest infestations like rats, lice and pathogen outbreaks. Approximately half of all Canadian soldiers in the war became casualties, by it wounded in action, grievously disfigured, or outright killed. Quite simply, soldiers were...

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Ending inequalities for First Nations children and young people

Liz Smith

Canada’s history is rooted in violent oppression. Our legacy of colonialism and ruthless intervention into the lives of First Nations people is not merely a distant memory, but one with continuing negative effects in contemporary society. On Sunday May 25th, Dr. Cindy Blackstock—Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada—drew in a full crowd of scholars and community members to the David S. Howes Theatre to address Canada’s shameful conduct that very often goes unrecognized. While we prefer to see Canada as a nation that upholds and practices principles of fairness, equity, and liberalism, in actuality our federal legislative policies have and continue to be responsible for keeping First Nations people disenfranchised and on the margins.

So what does this look like? Anyone who seeks a critical understanding about our nation’s history will know about the 1867 Indian Act introduced to eradicate Indian...

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Aider les personnes âgées des banlieues

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Géographe à la University of Alberta, Theresa Garvin veut améliorer la qualité de vie des personnes âgées vivant dans les banlieues :

Theresa Garvin participera au panel « Researching Environmental Health in Canada – Is That the Death Knell I Hear or the Sound of Opportunity Knocking? » qui se déroulera le vendredi 30 mai au Congrès des sciences humaines 2014. L...

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A conversation through time: a case study of Anne Clifford

Samara Bissonnette

In a twenty-first century university conference room, Dr. Leah Knight brought her audience back through time to the North in the English Renaissance. Her in-depth studies of one Anne Clifford, Countess of Dorset, were brought to life as she delivered a tantalizing taste of her research in a presentation entitled, "Living La Vida Local: Anne Clifford's Personal Typology of Place". Through a close analysis of Anne's own records, that Dr. Knight described how in terms of obsession, tedium and repetition, she was able to paint a colourful picture of Renaissance life.

In a time when technology advances at a pace that turns life into a hazy blur of speed, bustle, and impatience, taking a look at Cliford's life and records is incredibly worth-while for emphasizing the importance of the "simple life" and the local life that surrounds us on a daily basis. Clifford's interest in reassesing the value of the local...

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Lyse Doucet - Working in a savage reality

Doug Junke

Lyse Doucet, veteran BBC reporter, presenter and chief international correspondent has seen man at his worst.  It wasn’t pretty. She shared a tiny slice of that with the Congress 2014 Big Thinking audience Saturday afternoon.

It wasn’t for the weak-kneed.

The Bathurst, N.B. native and Queen’s University graduate has captured a Peabody Award, a David Bloom Award and several honorary doctorates for a spectacular 30-year journalism career that has in recent years centred on the world’s hotspots: Libya, Syria, Afghanistan.

“This is Canada’s biggest gathering of scholars across all disciplines …. big ideas, big brains,” Doucet said.

So, it was a good time...

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Lorsque science et créativité se rencontrent

Des artistes et des chercheurs collaborent afin d’apporter un regard nouveau sur la science biomédicale

Omar Mouallem, Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Ils ont tous deux siégé au conseil du Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada, corédigé deux livres et grandi dans la même maison à Mystic, au Connecticut. Pourtant, on trouverait difficilement des jumeaux ayant des avis aussi divergents sur la science que le professeur d’art et artiste, Sean Caulfield...

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MakerBus Magic

Jessica Dixon

Many of my formitive years were spent in front of the television set watching a show that allowed me to learn about the world I live in. The MakerBus reminds me that it will never be a normal field trip. Kim Martin, Ryan Hunt and Beth Compton have poured their combined efforts into one magic bus in order to bring the ‘why’ into the conversation. I was privileged to make their acquaintances and ask about the bus that has everyone talking.

“We all know that the humanities are important," they each agreed; “we want people to think about how they are, and what that means to them.”

Having purchased a bus in 2013 with the help of the London (...

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La boîte en carton prend du galon

Des chercheurs utilisent cette matière bon marché et légère pour aider des parents à concevoir du matériel personnalisé adapté aux besoins spéciaux de leur enfant

Malorie Bertrand, Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Quel parent n’a pas remarqué l’irrésistible attraction du carton sur leur enfant devant la joie qu’il manifeste lorsqu’il se coiffe de la boîte qui contenait le cadeau coûteux qu’il vient de mettre de côté. Il n’est donc pas surprenant que cette...

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Promesses remplies

Regard sur l’héritage de milliers d’esclaves noirs qui ont fui au Canada dans les années 1800

Laura Czekaj, Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation

Rendez-vous sur innovation.ca pour consulter des histoires de recherches en sciences sociales et humaines financées par la Fondation canadienne pour l’innovation. En finançant l’infrastructure de recherche de pointe dans toutes les disciplines, dans l’ensemble du spectrum des activités de recherche fondamentale et appliquée, la FCI procure aux chercheurs les outils dont ils ont besoin pour voir grand et innover.

 

Au XIXe siècle, des Noirs américains ont échappé à l’esclavage en s’installant dans des colonies du sud de l’Ontario qu’ils voyaient comme une terre de liberté et d’affranchissement où ils pourraient enfin réaliser leurs rêves.

Le périple de milliers d’esclaves en fuite et de Noirs libres d’Amérique...

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Social sciences and humanities themes run deep in Council of Canadian Academies research

Jeff Junke, Coordinator, Social Media and Communications, Council of Canadian Academies

The social sciences and humanities are an important cornerstone of Canada’s research strength. The Council knows this all too well thanks to its report, The State of Science and Technology in Canada, 2012, which identified three of Canada’s six fields of research strength as social sciences and humanities disciplines (historical studies, psychology and cognitive science, and visual and performing arts). More than ever before, these various and wide ranging disciplines are key to understanding many challenges in Canadian science, research, and policy.

The Council has been engaged in the social sciences and humanities since its inception. With a broad definition of “science” that includes the natural, social, and physical sciences, as well as engineering, the...

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A transdisciplinary space for social justice at Congress 2014

Rachel Hirsch, Projects Facilitator, Social Justice Research Institute, Brock University
Jeffrey Sinibaldi, Media Relations Manager, Marketing and Communications, Brock University

At Congress 2014, Brock’s Social Justice Research Institute (SJRI) will be creating a transdisciplinary space to foster dialogue and galvanize colleagues from the social sciences and humanities around themes of social justice.

A key priority for the newly created institute is to break down boundaries and connect the threads of social justice scholarship taking place across various disciplines. To do this at Congress, SJRI is helping to promote the social justice events of 21 academic and community organizations, including co-sponsoring 11 high profile events.

SJRI was established Fall 2013 as a leader in advanced transdisciplinary social justice scholarship,...

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L’avenir de la diffusion de la recherche : événements au Congrès 2014

Karen Diepeveen, Analyste des politiques, Fédération des sciences humaines

La question du libre accès et de la diffusion de la recherche alimente de nombreux interrogatifs dans nos domaines d’étude. Quel est l’avenir des travaux d’érudition à l’ère du numérique? Comment les chercheurs s’adaptent-ils ou devraient-ils le faire? Quelle incidence auront ces nouveaux modèles sur l’édition?

Avec la participation de plus de 8 000 chercheurs, éditeurs, intellectuels et lecteurs rassemblés pour l’occasion, le Congrès des sciences humaines fournit la tribune idéale pour discuter et débattre de ces questions. C’est dans cet esprit que nous avons dressé une liste d’événements ouverts à tous les congressistes désireux d’approfondir le lien entre la recherche et le libre accès, la diffusion des connaissances, l’édition et l’utilisation du savoir.

...

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Rethinking water, the stuff of life, through art at Congress

Stuart Reid, director/curator, Rodman Hall Art Centre, Brock University

As hosts of Congress 2014, all of us at Brock have been busy preparing an engaging and thought-provoking “Congress Plus” program for both our out-of-town and local guests.

As part of this made-at-Brock academic and cultural line up, Rodman Hall Art Centre is pleased to present The Source: Rethinking Water Through Contemporary Art, which will debut during Congress at our University.  

Echoing the theme of this year’s gathering, “Borders Without Boundaries,” water, of course, defines the boundaries between nations and peoples. But, in the greater scheme of things, water also erases and wipes away those differences.

Water is the...

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SSH News: Communiqué, Studying liberal arts

Looking for news from the Federation? This month’s Communiqué was released earlier today! If you haven’t already read it, be sure to sign up to receive future e-newsletters here. The Communiqué brings you the latest news about the Federation, its events, members and the latest news and information from the humanities and social sciences learning and research community in Canada.

Otherwise, a snapshot of interesting reads from this week focused on studying liberal arts include:

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Towards Journal/Library Partnership in Journal Publishing

Rowland Lorimer, Director, Master of Publishing Program and Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, Simon Fraser University

Sunday May 25
14:45 to 16:15
Schmon Tower Boardroom 13th Floor

It would be difficult to find a Canadian researcher in the humanities and social sciences who would not agree to having his or her work openly accessible to the world. The principle, whether you call it freedom of information or open access, is very much in keeping with public education, public funding for research, and the public interest.

The nobility of this principle has led to a worldwide embrace of open access especially in such areas as health research and physics....

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A behind the scenes look at preparing for Congress 2014

Brad Clarke, Project Manager for Congress 2014, Brock University

We’re now just two weeks away from hosting Canada’s largest academic gathering on our University’s campus situated in a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve atop the Niagara Escarpment in Ontario’s Niagara peninsula.

Though we welcome thousands of conference guests to Brock each year, this is the single largest conference our University has hosted since the last time Congress, then The Learneds, came to campus in 1996.

With registration currently at more than 6,700 attendees, our team is busy reconfiguring and transforming our campus to accommodate the burst of creative energy that this event will bring to Niagara.

The transformation is a lot like when a sports organization switches a playing field from a hockey...

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Sometimes it is enough to simply be excellent

Guest post by Michael Adams The Environics Institute and Environics Research Group

The following is a speech given by Michael Adams at the 2014 Canada Prizes award ceremony at York University’s Glendon College Campus on May 7, 2014, where the Federation celebrated this year’s four winners.

Good evening, everyone. It is an honour for me to have been asked to be deliver the keynote address for this year’s Canada Prize Awards, especially as I served on the jury with two distinguished scholars: Janice Stein of the University of Toronto’s Munk School and professor Greg Kealey...

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SSH News: Farley Mowat, Canada Prizes award ceremony, Hot button issues in higher education

It is with a heavy heart that Canada says goodbye to Farley Mowat, a literary great and passionate Canadian. Mowat passed away, yesterday, at the age of 92. “Mowat, author of dozens of works including Lost in the Barrens and Never Cry Wolf, introduced Canada to readers around the world and shared everything from his time abroad during the Second World War, to his travels in the North and his concern for the deteriorating environment,” writes the CBC.

In much brighter news from the Canadian literary scene, the Federation was honoured to award the four winners of the 2014 Canada Prizes at a gala held yesterday at York University...

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Une dose de français au Congrès ! Getting your French fix at Congress!

Chaque année, les associations qui participant au Congrès lancent des appels de propositions d’articles illustrant toute perspective disciplinaire ou interdisciplinaire. Tout comme les années précédentes, la Fédération se réjouit de voir une augmentation continue de séances qui sont en français !

In addition to getting your French fix from the list of highlighted events below that are free and open to Congress attendees, there will also be events in Spanish and with ASL interpretation.

Pour une dose de français, d’espagnol et pour connaître les événements où l’interprétation en langage des signes sera disponible lors du Congrès, assurez-vous de profiter des séances énumérées ci-dessous.

Les nouvelles frontières de l'histoire du livre
Samedi 24 mai, 11 h 00...

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Adrien Arcand et la propagande antisémite

Prix du Canada

Par Daniel Drolet

Les chemises bleues : Adrien Arcand, journaliste antisémite canadien-français

Le journaliste canadien Adrien Arcand aurait largement contribué à la montée internationale du négationnisme, le mouvement qui remet en cause l’Holocauste.

En fait, selon Hugues Théorêt, auteur du livre Les chemises bleues : Adrien Arcand, journaliste antisémite canadien-français, Arcand a été...

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Montréal vu par un immigrant juif du début du 20e siècle

Canada Prizes

Par Daniel Drolet

Jacob-Isaac Segal, 1896-1954 : Un poète yiddish de Montréal et son milieu

Pendant 50 ans, au début du 20e siècle, le yiddish a été la troisième langue en importance à Montréal après le français et l’anglais.

Un nouveau livre du professeur Pierre Anctil de l’Université d’Ottawa fait découvrir l’œuvre de Jacob-Isaac Segal, un poète montréalais de l’époque qui n’a écrit qu’...

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Montréal vu par un immigrant juif du début du 20e siècle

Canada Prizes

Par Daniel Drolet

Jacob-Isaac Segal, 1896-1954 : Un poète yiddish de Montréal et son milieu

Pendant 50 ans, au début du 20e siècle, le yiddish a été la troisième langue en importance à Montréal après le français et l’anglais.

Un nouveau livre du professeur Pierre Anctil de l’Université d’Ottawa fait découvrir l’œuvre de Jacob-Isaac Segal, un poète montréalais de l’époque qui n’a écrit qu’...

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SSH News: Winners for Canada Prizes announced, Bacon & Big Thinking, Wage gaps


This week, the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences was very pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 Canada Prizes. The Canada Prizes are awarded annually to the best scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences that have received funding from the Awards to Scholarly Publications Program. This year’s winners are:

Canada Prize in the Humanities
Sandra Djwa
, for Journey With No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page (McGill-Queen's University Press)

Canada Prize in the Social Sciences
David E. Smith
, for Across the Aisle: Opposition in Canadian Politics...

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