avril 2016

Archives

Brand Command: Canadian Politics and Democracy in the Age of Message Control

Alex Marland, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Before entering academia, I worked in communications consulting and in government. In the private sector, we had lots of time to ruminate about marketing strategy. But in government, the best laid plans were often dispatched in the rush to deal with the tyranny of the urgent. Why? In the public sector, the intensity of media attention is unrelenting. Communicators lunge from issue to issue. It is a world of nonstop 24/7 media, smartphones, social media outbursts and impossible expectations.

My research in Brand Command: Canadian Politics and Democracy in the Age of Message Control argues that message control and party discipline is important to anyone who rises to the top. I draw on information from over 70 interviews with...

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New to Congress Expo, the Expo Passport

By Ashley Craven, Event Planner at the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Formerly known as the Book Fair, our Congress trade show has changed a lot over the past several years. Now known simply as Expo and housed in the Congress Hub, it features over 50 exhibitors that are looking to connect with the attendees at Congress. This year, we have introduced the Expo Passport for our attendees to have the opportunity to win great prizes while they visit our exciting Congress Expo exhibitors.

The Expo Passport will be attached to the outside of the Congress Guide that you will pick up at registration. Keep this with you whenever you are headed to Expo in the Congress Hub. Whether it be to grab a quick snack or refuel on coffee at the Thinking Cup Café, check out the...

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Remembering Stephen Clarkson: Public intellectual, teacher and scholar

Mel Watkins, Professor Emeritus, Department of Economics, University of Toronto

Stephen Clarkson was my colleague and friend for more than 50 years. Gracious and congenial, he was an intensely private person.

He was a legendary teacher who could give a polished lecture without notes. I taught a course with him for many years and he set the bar high. He was much respected by students, who gave him high evaluations.

He was a prolific researcher and writer who received many awards. Fittingly, indefatigable at 78, still not retired and with serious health problems, he was in Portugal on a research tour with students when he fell fatally ill. He died on the go, students in his wake, with pen in hand.

He was proficient in English, French, Spanish, German, Russian and Italian.

He...

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Faculty of Environmental Design embraces Congress 2016 theme of “Energizing Communities” through full-day tour of Calgary

Jennifer Robitaille, Communications Specialist, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary

As part of the Congress 2016 exciting line-up of events, the University of Calgary will host six Interdisciplinary symposia to exhibit the university’s most compelling and leading-edge thinking and research. This article is part of a six-part series showcasing each event, all of which are open to Congress attendees and the general public.

On May 30, 2016, the Faculty of Environmental Design (EVDS) will host Energizing by design: Examining how design-based research is transforming the built environment. This unique, off-campus event is a full-day, multi-...

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Getting radically interdisciplinary with the sciences

Natalie Brender, National Director, Genomics in Society, Genome Canada

 

More visibly than ever, advocates for the humanities and social sciences (HSS) are making the case that their fields must be considered not just on par with, but actually as partners with, the natural sciences in contributing to societal goods. The new federal environment is propitious, with the government’s announced reviews of science policy and innovation policy, as well as a commitment to evidence-based policymaking. These developments offer a new receptiveness to the notion that the natural sciences are most productive when combined with HSS insights.

There are also signs that the natural sciences are becoming more aware of the benefits of getting radically interdisciplinary—meaning not just chemists talking...

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Rethinking graduate education to access greater career opportunities

By Veronica Vincent

As part of the Congress 2016 exciting line-up of events, the University of Calgary will host six Interdisciplinary symposia to exhibit the university’s most compelling and leading-edge thinking and research. This article is part of a six-part series showcasing each event, all of which are open to Congress attendees and the general public.

The University of Calgary’s Faculty of Graduate Studies has taken bold steps over the past few years to enrich the graduate student experience and has made new headway in preparing students for work, not just in academic professions, but also for the private and public sectors.

On May 31, 2016, the Faculty will host an Interdisciplinary symposium called Mobilizing Graduate Students for Diverse...

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10 Ways to Use Digital Humanities to Enhance Your Research, Teaching and Dissemination: June 2 and 3 at Congress

Constance Crompton, Assistant Professor, Digital Humanities and English, Department of Critical Studies | Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies

The DHSI@Congress returns for a third year with eight hands-on workshops and two plenary talks that introduce Digital Humanities (DH) techniques, tools  and methods. Developed for faculty, students, and staff who are curious about DH, but would like a hand getting started, the series features 2.5-hour workshops on topics from project management to DH pedagogy, from theoretical issues to command line 101 (and more!). If you have ever wondered how to create your own multimedia digital exhibits, trace stylistic shifts in a novel, share files with collaborators, or integrate DH into the...

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L’influence de certaines familles importantes toujours présente au Québec

L’élite sociale du Québec a pu imposer ses valeurs à la société québécoise au point où même aujourd’hui les espaces publics comme les églises, les cimetières et les parcs influencent notre comportement, affirme un historien de l’Université McGill.

Brian Young est l’auteur de Patrician Families and the Making of Quebec: The Taschereaus and McCords, qui vient de remporter le Prix du Canada 2016 en sciences humaines décerné par la Fédération des sciences humaines. Le livre trace l’histoire de deux grandes familles bourgeoises sur une période de 150 ans, de 1780 à 1930 environ.

Les Taschereau sont francophones et catholiques; les McCord anglophones et protestants. Le cheminement des deux familles se ressemble : Grands propriétaires terriens, ils se servent de leurs terres pour s’enrichir et...

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Les connaissances des peoples autochtones montrent la voie de la durabilité écologique

Nancy Turner affirme que les connaissances acquises au fil des millénaires par les peuples autochtones montrent qu’il est possible de développer une approche durable à l’utilisation des ressources naturelles. Ces connaissances, dit-elle, ont permis à ces peuples de survivre et même de s’épanouir en dépit de changements climatiques aussi importants que la fin de la dernière époque glacière.

Mme Turner, une spécialiste en ethnobotanique, vient de gagner le Prix du Canada 2016 en sciences sociales pour un livre en deux tomes qui explore la connaissance des plantes que possèdent les peuples autochtones du nord-ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Le prix est attribué par la Fédération des sciences humaines.

Intitulé Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous...

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Alimentation et pouvoir : Quand les élites nous disent quoi manger

 

L’alimentation, selon Caroline Durand, est un lieu de convergence de plusieurs aspects de la vie humaine, dont la santé, la science, les relations homme-femme, les relations sociales et le rapport à la nature. L’étude de l’alimentation devient donc une loupe intéressante pour observer les humains.

Dans son livre Nourrir la machine humaine : Nutrition et alimentation au Québec, 1860-1945, Mme Durand brosse le portrait d’une société où les élites utilisent l’alimentation pour tenter d’imposer leur façon de penser. Le livre de Mme Durand vient de se voir attribuer le Prix du Canada 2016 en sciences humaines. Le prix est décerné par la Fédération des sciences humaines.

La période examinée dans le livre correspond à l’industrialisation du Québec et du déplacement massif de la...

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Adolescentes et mode : Repenser la question d’hypersexualisation

Il y a une dizaine d’années, la chanteuse populaire Britney Spears a fait couler beaucoup d’encre en déclenchant une controverse au sujet des adolescentes qui imitaient sa façon dite ‘sexy’ de s’habiller.

Caroline Caron, une professeure au Département des sciences sociales à l’Université du Québec en Outaouais, a cherché à déconstruire le discours autour de la mode sexy chez les jeunes filles – en partie en donnant la parole aux adolescentes elles-mêmes.

Le résultat est un livre, Vues, mais non entendues : Les adolescentes québécoises et l’hypersexualisation, qui vient de recevoir le Prix du Canada 2016 en sciences sociales de la Fédération des sciences humaines.

Selon Mme Caron, il n’y a jamais eu de vrai débat autour de la tenue ‘sexy’ des...

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The Faculty of Nursing’s symposium will take a fresh, multidisciplinary approach to compassion during Congress 2016

As part of the Congress 2016 exciting line-up of events, the University of Calgary will host six Interdisciplinary symposia to exhibit the university’s most compelling and leading-edge thinking and research. This article is part of a six-part series showcasing each event, all of which are open to Congress attendees and the general public.

On Sunday May 29, the Faculty of Nursing will host an Interdisciplinary symposium on compassion called Compassion under Contemporary Conditions: Keynote with Margaret Atwood; panels with scholars and community leaders. Why compassion and why now?  Glad you asked!   Symposium leads Graham McCaffrey (RN PhD) and Shane Sinclair (BA, MDiv, PhD) answer all your burning questions.

Q: So why compassion and why now?

McCaffrey: Compassion has become a subject of interest...

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Des chercheurs en philosophie partagent leurs perspectives pour répondre aux défis de recherche de partenaires

 

Robyn Dugas, Coordonnatrice des communications, Mitacs

Mitacs et la faculté de philosophie de l’Université de Waterloo se sont associés pour une initiative qui permet à des étudiants des cycles supérieurs et des chercheurs postdoctoraux d’utiliser leurs approches philosophiques dans leurs collaborations avec des partenaires régionaux.

La collaboration émane d’un stage de 2014 de Teresa Branch Smith, une candidate au doctorat en philosophie de l’université et Philip Beesley Architects. Ensemble, ils ont examiné les constructions philosophiques de la vie et du vivant en ce qu’elles s’appliquent à l’architecture quasi...

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Access to Social Justice symposium will explore social justice issues in Calgary

By Natalie Dawes and Alison Abel

Law and Social Work faculties aim to develop policies and action plans that will make real improvements in access to social justice. Top speakers include Thomas Cromwell, a Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and more—read on!

As part of Congress 2016 exciting line-up of events, the University of Calgary will host six Interdisciplinary symposia to exhibit the university’s most compelling and leading-edge thinking and research. This article is part of a six-part series showcasing each event, all of which are open to Congress attendees and the general public.

On May 28, the Faculties of Law and Social Work will...

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