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Bienvenue sur le blogue de la Fédération des sciences humaines. Les publications sur ce site sont l’opinion de leurs auteurs et ne reflètent pas nécessairement la position officielle de la Fédération, de son personnel et du conseil d’administration. Elles sont affichées selon la langue de l’auteur.

Les membres du milieu de la recherche universitaire sont encouragés à soumettre des commentaires sur des questions reliées au bien-être de la recherche des sciences humaines et des sciences sociales et de l’apprentissage au Canada. Cliquez ici pour lire la politique en matière de blogue de la Fédération. Veuillez envoyer votre soumission à communications@ideas-idees.ca.

Les femmes Patriotes : des correspondantes politisées

Il existait au 19e siècle une frontière très nette entre la sphère du privé – une sphère domestique habitée essentiellement par les femmes – et la vie publique, un domaine d’affaires et de politique surtout masculin.

Un nouveau livre par Mylène Bédard de l’Université Laval vient montrer que la frontière entre les deux sphères était plus poreuse qu’on ne le croyait, surtout pour les femmes. En examinant les lettres des femmes Patriotes au Québec, Mme Bédard montre l’engagement politique de femmes pourtant exclues de la vie publique.

Le livre de Mme Bédard, Écrire en temps d’insurrections : Pratiques épistolaires et usages de la presse chez les femmes patriotes (1830-...

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The Doctoral Dissertation – A Consultation

Guest blog by the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies (CAGS)

There was a time when a PhD dissertation in the Humanities or most Social Sciences was an early version of a single-authored scholarly manuscript. Things are changing. Today, the three-article thesis is accepted –  even the norm – in some disciplines. And dissertations comprised primarily of creative works are a basic requirement in other programs. 

In 2014, Eric Weissman’s (PhD Indi -Concordia) multi-media, interdisciplinary work “Spaces, Places and States of Mind: a Pragmatic Ethnography,” was given CAGS’s Distinguished Dissertation Award. Weissman’s approach recognized that the complexities of homelessness couldn’t be organized into a traditional manuscript. Another example...

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Expo Passport is back!

Guest blog by Ashley Craven, Event Planner, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The Expo Passport is back for Congress 2017! Once again, attendees will have the opportunity to win great prizes while they visit our exciting Congress Expo exhibitors. Expo is sold out this year and we are looking forward to featuring over 50 exhibitors for our attendees to meet. Check out a full list of exhibitors here

The Expo Passport will be attached to the outside of the Congress Essentials Guide that you will receive at registration. Keep this with you whenever you are in the Expo tradeshow in the Congress Hub. Whether it be to grab a quick snack or refuel on coffee at the RAMS Café, attend a Career...

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The role of poets as cultural game-changers

Guest blog by Manina Jones, President, Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English

What is the importance of the poet in the public sphere? 

George Elliott Clarke, Parliamentary Poet Laureate of Canada and E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature at the University of Toronto, is a literary critic keen to understand the rich history and continuing influence of Canadian literary cultures, the role of poets as cultural game-changers who can mobilize the power of language to challenge the way we think. As a poet, Clarke steps up to this role himself, in accessible, dramatic writing, and moving public performances. A scholar, poet and activist, Clarke pursues the mandate of Parliamentary Poet Laureate “to encourage and promote the importance of...

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Back in hallowed halls: Experiences of a Public Servant-in-Residence

Jean-Pierre Morin, Adjunct Research Professor and Public Servant-in-Residence, Department of History, Carleton University

Since the age of 12, I have had only one career goal: to be an historian working in the federal government. Yes, this is a rather strange life goal for a kid, but everyone has their dreams. I set out to study history and after completing my graduate studies, I joined the federal department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (now Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada) in 1999. Throughout my studies, I never had any intention of working in academia – I wanted to be a career public servant and I was very happy being the “departmental historian” at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

In the winter of 2014, however, a stray hyperlink at the bottom of a government of Canada web page got me thinking about something else. After 15 years with the “Feds,” I was looking for new opportunities as an historian and public servant....

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