Antiracisme

Guess who’s coming to dinner? That is, after you hire us.

Guest post by Dr. Annette Henry, Professor and David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia

Consider the following statements from search committee meetings at various universities involving racialized candidates. My purpose in sharing these statements is to raise questions about institutional commitments to hire Black faculty.

Our first candidate understands this theory the way we do, but the second candidate has another interpretation of the theory”

This example illustrates how faculty may unwittingly reproduce their own thinking by hiring people who think like them, and in which faculty members may find flimsy reasons to not hire qualified candidates under...

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In the Middle. . . Somewhat Dislocated

Guest Blog by Dr. Henry Daniel, Professor of Dance, Performance Studies and New Media Technologies, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

This blog draws on my performance "In the Middle...Somewhat Dislocated" from the recent BCSA Conference (Black Canadian Studies Association) at Congress 2019 at The University of British Columbia. It also touches on some of the ideas presented in my keynote paper “Decolonizing Bodies: Engaging Performance” given at the...

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La rentrée 2019 – Qu’en disent les médias?

Lily Polowin, coordinatrice des communications, Fédération des sciences humaines

Depuis mon arrivée à la Fédération le 31 mai dernier (c’est-à-dire le premier jour du Congrès 2019), je suis attentivement ce que disent les médias au sujet des études post-secondaires au Canada. En ce début de trimestre, voici un résumé de ce qui rend la rentrée 2019 si unique. Bonne lecture!

Pour plusieurs, l’équité et la représentation dans le milieu universitaire sont des priorités en cette période de rentrée. En effet, le Programme des chaires de recherche du Canada a récemment mis à jour ses pratiques en matière d’équité en fixant des cibles plus...

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Who is telling our stories? Canadian millennials in literature and the humanities

 

Kofi Hope, Rhodes Scholar, Doctor of Philosophy in Politics & Managing Director, Community Empowering Enterprises

On July 14, Go Set a Watchman will be released to the general public, a sequel of sorts to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.  Few works of literature have had a more profound role in shaping conversations on race in the 20th century than To Kill a Mockingbird

For my part, I read the book in 1999 as a grade 10 student in Mississauga.  While undoubtedly a classic novel, To Kill a Mockingbird...

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Global sustainable development goals have potential to drive change in Canada

Shannon Kindornay, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

There is no question that 2015 is a year for change both within Canada and abroad. As noted by Julia Sánchez, President-CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation, in her blog on Canada’s engagement with global social justice, not only are Canadians facing an election year in 2015, but changes are afoot on the global stage. This year, governments will negotiate a set of universal Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the United Nations to replace the Millennium Development Goals that will expire at the end of 2015. These goals will apply to all countries,...

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Caring Across Boundaries at Congress

Andrea Auger, Reconciliation and Research Manager, First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada

The First Nations Child and Family Caring Society (the Caring Society) is thrilled to be a part of the 2015 Congress for the Humanities and Social Sciences. We invite attendees to see the “Caring Across Boundaries” photo exhibition that brings viewers closer to the lived realities and aspirations of three First Nations communities: Attawapiskat First Nation (Ontario), Carrier Sekani Nations (British Columbia) and Tobique First Nation (New Brunswick). Seen through the lens of internationally renowned photographer Liam Sharp, members of the First Nations invite people to take positive steps towards reconciliation and a future of wellbeing for First Nations and all children and youth in Canada.

Caring Across Boundaries has...

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"The Nuances of Blackness and/in the Canadian Academy" – A tool for engaging with equity pedagogy in the graduate classroom

Author: Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor, Brock University

Over the past few years, I have used the Federation for the Humanities and Social Science’s Equity Matters blog series as a teaching tool for my graduate level courses in education.  The Federation’s blog is an excellent mechanism for community building and knowledge exchange.  It provides scholars who are committed to theoretical and critical research with a wealth of public, open access materials to share with students. These materials, in the form of panel presentations, online discussions and posts, provide a way for students to step into equity conversations and engage with them.

"The Nuances of Blackness and/in the...

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