Questions d'équité

Le confinement comme prétexte politique

Blogue invité par Patrick Ouadiaboutou, Enseignant chercheur et auteur, Université Marien Ngouabi,Congo Brazzaville. 

L’année 2019 s’est refermée sur une crise sanitaire d’ampleur mondiale qui augure des lendemains sombres du premier semestre 2020. En effet, commencée dans la Wuhan comme épidémie le 17 Novembre 2019, le coronavirus deviendra très vite une pandémie compte tenu de son expansion rapide sur tous les continents. Entre autres mesures prises pour endiguer ce fléau  jusqu’ici sans remède, figure le confinement des habitants en vue de stopper la chaîne de contamination. L’Afrique, un des cinq continents, n’en est pas épargné. Le Congo-Brazzaville en Afrique centrale, au pire de sa crise économique vit une nouvelle crise : la pandémie dite COVID-19. Au regard des mesures prises sur ce continent,...

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We Must Tackle and Dismantle Systemic Racism and White Supremacy.

Guest blog by Dr. Bathseba Opini, Assistant Professor of Teaching, The University of British Columbia

The exploitation, control and violence against Black people in the Americas is not a new phenomenon. We have seen the world of Black people worsen each day, month, year, decade, and century. The events of May 25, 2020 were another breaking point in the long history of Black oppression by systems and structures controlled predominantly by white people. George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, was murdered in cold blood by Derek Chauvin – a white police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Black people have been punching bags of racist white police officers and white systems for centuries. Black people have been pinned down for ages by white systems which empower white people like Chauvin to use a knee to neck tactic to restrain Floyd. Anti-Black racism must be understood as different from racism, which is a systemic reality; killing, institutionalized abuse...

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Indigenous knowledges and inclusivity: understanding the challenges before science.

Guest blog by Julien Commanda, a member of the Anishinaabe people, currently studying at Carleton University in Communications and Media.

When I was invited by the Federation to attend the Canadian Science Policy Conference and write about my experience and thoughts, I found it rather intriguing. For me, "science" meant what they call "hard science" (e.g. Math, Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences), which came in contrast to my Social Sciences background and particular interest in Indigenous Studies. As a young Anishinaabe man, the interest in Indigenous Studies did not happen by accident ― it is a field that allowed me to learn a lot about myself and to tap into my intellectual curiosities and passion. Once I read about the conference and got a glimpse into its program, I began to understand that "science policy" is actually inclusive of all sciences,...

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Beyond a Single Story: Black Lives and Hidden Figures in the Canadian Academy

photo of Dr. Malinda S. Smith standing in front of bookcase wearing redGuest blog by Dr. Malinda S. Smith, a Professor of Political Science and a 2018 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow at the University of Alberta, a former Executive member (Equity & Diversity) on the FHSS Board, coauthor of The Equity Myth (2017), and a coeditor of the forthcoming book, The Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy.

As Congress 2020 undertakes to “Bridge Divides” and confront the intersections of colonialism and anti-Black racism, it is critical to confront the histories and multiplicity of Black lives in Canada. As Desmond Cole’s new book reminds us, Black lives are neither reducible to “...

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Indigenous knowledges and inclusivity: understanding the challenges before science.

Guest blog by Julien Commanda, a member of the Anishinaabe people, currently studying at Carleton University in Communications and Media.

When I was invited by the Federation to attend the Canadian Science Policy Conference and write about my experience and thoughts, I found it rather intriguing. For me, "science" meant what they call "hard science" (e.g. Math, Physics, Chemistry, Earth Sciences), which came in contrast to my Social Sciences background and particular interest in Indigenous Studies. As a young Anishinaabe man, the interest in Indigenous Studies did not happen by accident ― it is a field that allowed me to learn a lot about myself and to tap into my intellectual curiosities and passion. Once I read about the conference and got a glimpse into its program, I began to understand that "science policy" is actually inclusive of all sciences,...

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In the Middle. . . Somewhat Dislocated

Guest Blog by Dr. Henry Daniel, Professor of Dance, Performance Studies and New Media Technologies, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

This blog draws on my performance "In the Middle...Somewhat Dislocated" from the recent BCSA Conference (Black Canadian Studies Association) at Congress 2019 at The University of British Columbia. It also touches on some of the ideas presented in my keynote paper “Decolonizing Bodies: Engaging Performance” given at the...

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In the Middle. . . Somewhat Dislocated

Guest Blog by Dr. Henry Daniel, Professor of Dance, Performance Studies and New Media Technologies, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

This blog draws on my performance "In the Middle...Somewhat Dislocated" from the recent BCSA Conference (Black Canadian Studies Association) at Congress 2019 at The University of British Columbia. It also touches on some of the ideas presented in my keynote paper “Decolonizing Bodies: Engaging Performance” given at the...

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Creating the Spaces Where I Belong: Phenomenology of an African Canadian Professor

Guest blog by Tamari Kitossa, Associate Professor, Sociology, Brock University

This essay is a modified contribution to the forthcoming collection The Nuances of Blackness in the Canadian Academy, edited by Awad Ibrahim, Tamari Kitossa, Malinda Smith and Handel K. Wright. I wish to express my appreciation to Anita Jack-Davies, Carl James, Delores Mullings and Awad Ibrahim for commentary on various stages of this paper. Errors and omissions are mine.

Introduction            

           Phenomenologically the lifeworld of an African Canadian professor is fraught with ambivalence,...

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Positioning Blackness, Necessarily, Awkwardly, in the Canadian Academy

Guest blog by Handel Kashope Wright, Professor and Director of Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, The University of British Columbia

This blog is based on a paper presented on the panel #Black Professors Matter: Experiences in White Academe at the 2019 Canadian Sociological Association Conference. The paper is an abridged version of “The Awkward Presence of Blackness in the Canadian Academy,” a contribution to The Nuances of Blackness and the Canadian Academy, a forthcoming book co-edited by Awad Ibrahim, Tamari Kittosa, Malinda Smith and Handel Kashope Wright.

The Canadian academy at the present historical juncture, like much of the academy worldwide, has become the neo-liberal academy in a time of extended austerity. Academic work is now highly stressful...

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Positioning Blackness, Necessarily, Awkwardly, in the Canadian Academy

Guest blog by Handel Kashope Wright, Professor and Director of Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, The University of British Columbia

This blog is based on a paper presented on the panel #Black Professors Matter: Experiences in White Academe at the 2019 Canadian Sociological Association Conference. The paper is an abridged version of “The Awkward Presence of Blackness in the Canadian Academy,” a contribution to The Nuances of Blackness and the Canadian Academy, a forthcoming book co-edited by Awad Ibrahim, Tamari Kittosa, Malinda Smith and Handel Kashope Wright.

The Canadian academy at the present historical juncture, like much of the academy worldwide, has become the neo-liberal academy in a time of extended austerity. Academic work is now highly stressful...

Read more »

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