mai 2021

Archives

Lessons Re-Learned in the Pandemic: Opportunities for Equality and Justice in Internationalized Higher Education

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

How has COVID-19 opened opportunities for equality and justice in internationalized education? What risks do internationalizing university communities face in the year ahead? These were the two guiding questions of an interactive panel discussion that examined the privilege that exists in internationalized higher education.  

Revealing problems and privilege, at home and abroad 

As Dr. Christina W. Yao poignantly explained, “the pandemic was a new circumstance that highlighted many issues that weren’t really new at all.” Indeed, deeply ingrained social and political issues of Black and Asian racism, discriminatory immigration policy, and increasing revenue and enrolment pressures on universities have come to the forefront, with us watching, hoping, to see them finally be addressed.   

Dr. Crain Soudier...

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Analysing the Residential School Era

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The Stolen Niitsitapi (the Real People) Children webcast at Congress 2021 was an open event hosted by the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE). It featured a powerful and innovative presentation by Tiffany Prete who eloquently spoke on the struggles Indigenous children in Canada endured at the hands of the Government. Also in attendance was Jennifer Tupper, the Dean of Faculty of Education, University of Alberta. 

Research Project 

Partnering with several archives and museums across Canada, Prete conducted an archival and oral history research study to explore, reveal and record significant aspects of the Indian residential school history. Additionally, she worked with a group of Elders from the blood reserve. 

Childhood 

Prete spoke about how when growing up, she was always fearful...

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Dissecting the Canadian Higher Education System

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The Canadian Society for the Study of Education’s Foundations of Higher Education webcast at Congress 2021 was an open event featuring presentations by Sarah Elaine Eaton from the University of Calgary, James Czank from Lakehead University, Linda Wheeldon from Acadia University, Sandra Bruneau and Michelle Forrest.  

Canadian higher education 

Canadian higher education institutions were developed under the models of Britain and France.  

“In some important respects, Canada's higher education is the story of a network of institutions that break all the rules in terms of accepted norms of organizational theory and system design”- Glen Jones. 

Drawing on this quote, Eaton discussed Canada’s lack of a national system, National Ministry of Higher Education, National Education, Higher Education...

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In the Wake of Injustice: The Congress Advisory Committee on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Decolonization 

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Members of the Congress Advisory Committee on Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Decolonization met with the academic community to review and reflect on their report and recommendations entitled “Igniting Change.” The discussion rested somberly in the wake of the recent discovery of 215 Indigenous bodies that were found on the grounds of the Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, as confirmed by Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc Chief Rosanna Casimir. The session began with a moment of silence for the injustice and was reflected on continuously throughout the meeting.   

A standout moment of this meeting came when Lindsay Heller, a Nehiyaw scholar from Simon Fraser University and skilled facilitator from the Michel First Nation, led an inquiry into the report’s outcomes. Heller...

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Performing Narratives of Black Racial Identity in the Digital-Era

 
Congress 2021 blog edition
 
By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 
 
Playwright, Canadian television broadcaster, and social activist Rita Deverell, from Mount Saint Vincent University, takes her audience through an exploration and reflection of her award-winning play “Who you Callin’ Black Eh?” Deverell writes a narrative that dives deep into the nuances of racial identity and the politics of claiming membership to a racial community.  
 
Deverell begins her talk with a discussion of her lived experience and prolific career in broadcasting by starting with her birth in 1945 Houston, Texas. Deverell explains: “And for the record, I have been Black and female ever since then. Which you can quickly do the math is 75 years. This has never been, in fact, a source of question for me. I am...

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Effective, successful and happy academics—do they know something we don’t?

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening - University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

The academic world is full of possibilities and opportunities, so there is a lot of noise we must navigate through as we determine our career paths. Dr. Alex Clark and Bailey Sousa talked about how to set ourselves up for success and fulfillment in our work in a workshop offered by the Peter Lougheed Leadership College and the University of Alberta. 

Align your work with your values: Know your values and articulate them to yourself. Knowing the ‘big why’ that underscores what you do will reinforce your work’s purpose and offer your career direction. Aligning your work with your values as you move forward can help you decide what you should do, rather than taking on projects and responsibilities just because they are there.  

To identify your values, ask yourself why you got into your work in the...

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What Does It Mean to “Flinch from Black Touch?” Dr. Shirley Anne Tate Speaks on Racism in Our Academic Institutions in Big Thinking Session

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Dr. Shirley Anne Tate has analyzed the effects of institutionalized anti-Black racism for more than a decade. In her Big Thinking series lecture entitled “Racism's touch: 'I can't quite put my finger on it'”, she discussed these effects--shame, fear, hate, disgust and contempt--and how they exist in the ‘post-race’ academic world.  

Somehow, it seems anti-Black institutional racism has disappeared into thin air. Yet, the intensity of racism’s effects remain--we sense it. It’s just that now, racism is so familiar and so frequent. “Racism permeates the walls of institutions and animates interactions with such intensity that we can sense it effectively, but cannot voice these feelings because of their deniability.” Deniability can be reinforced by university policies and procedures around complaints.  

Black...

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Advocating Social Justice and Human Rights

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The University of Alberta Career Corner’s “Careers in Social Justice and Human Rights'' webcast featured professionals working in areas of social justice and human rights, who shed light to the audience on new perspectives on their skills, knowledge, and abilities and how they can apply it to working in these areas.  

The panelists not only explored careers in the context of social justice and human rights, but also acknowledged the lack of justice for many today, including first peoples, people of colour, newcomers, women, people with disabilities, LGBTQ+ communities and many more. 

Career Education Coordinator Chris Daber, who identifies as a queer, white, cisgender settler, introduced the discussion’s main focus towards exploring career options for working in the social justice and human rights fields before...

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Cheers to the Edwardian Era! Congress Attendees Enjoy an Era-Specific Wine Tasting

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

On May 29, Congress 2021 toasted Edwardian era wines in a virtual happy hour! John Gerum of Unique Tasting Adventures led attendees through a menu straight out of history in a virtual wine experience hosted by the University of Alberta. Gerum led the tasting on site at Rutherford House, a historic gem on the University of Alberta campus.  

The Edwardian dinner party 

At the turn of the century, Rutherford House would have hosted many lavish dinner parties. These dinners would have been three to four hours long, with 20 or so guests enjoying 10+ courses. An sample menu from an Edwardian era dinner was provided to session attendees. It listed 14 courses: the oyster course, the soup, the fish, the entree, the roast, the asparagus, the game, the salad, the pudding, the ice cream...

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Dealing with Unpredictability and Career Disruptions

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The University of Alberta Career Corner’s “Supporting Students’ Career Management” webcast featured strategies supervisors and advisors can employ to best support their students and encourage them to confidently manage their careers. 

After acknowledging that the University of Alberta respects the histories, languages and cultures of its peoples, University of Alberta Career Advisors Tyree McCrackin and Mykhaylo Bodnar discussed their wide range of ideas for helping academic advisors during this interactive segment and answered questions from the audience.  

McCrackin spoke about how growing up, he believed the word “career” was interchangeable with the word job or vocation. However, that is no longer the case. In order to reflect this change, the Career Centre at the University of Alberta has expanded its views...

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Bringing the ‘Science’ to Social Sciences: A Workshop on Using AI Techniques in Arts and Humanities Research

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Geared towards researchers who are keen on experimenting with generative artificial intelligence (AI) in their research, the two-hour workshop, “Using Generative AI Techniques in the Arts and Humanities,” aimed to show participants that it is possible to train new artificial intelligence (AI) to generate text, sound, and images by giving them the chance to experiment with code that generates text from provided training materials. This workshop was led by University of Alberta PhD student Paolo Verdini, hosted by the University of Alberta Signature Area, AI4Society, and organized by AI4Society Associate Director Geoffrey Rockwell. 

To start things off, what are recurrent neural networks (RNNs) anyway? Verdini suggested visualizing it as more akin to a human brain than traditional machine learning algorithms. Imagine a human being reading over a piece of...

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Heeding the Calls to Action: Teaching Courses on Residential School Literature

 
Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

On Saturday, May 29, 2021, the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) hosted “Pedagogy and Residential School Literatures: A Dialogue” at Congress. The conversation was joined by Deanna Reder, Associate Professor and Department Chair of Indigenous Studies at Simon Fraser University; Michelle Coupal, Canadian Research Chair in Truth, Reconciliation, and Indigenous Literatures and Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Regina; and Aubrey Jean Hanson, Co-President of the Canadian Association for the Study of Indigenous Education (CASIE) and Associate Professor in the Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary. 

To start, Reder provided a disclaimer that this material may be difficult to get through, stressing the importance of both grounding yourself in...

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150 Acts of Reconciliation: A Pathway to Reconciling Past Wrongs

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The University of Alberta’s “Acts of Reconciliation during Ongoing Colonial Violence” webcast tackled how everyday acts of reconciliation and solidarity can be catalysts for profound change. Crystal Fraser, Assistant Professor, Department of History Classics, & Religious Studies and the Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta, and Sara Komarnisky, Research Manager, Hotıì ts'eeda: NWT SPOR Support Unit, Tłįchǫ Government and Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, presented an in-depth outlook into their 2017 150 Acts of Reconciliation for the Last 150 Days of Canada list, their process for creating it, and the impact it still continues to have.  

They also addressed the sensitive topics of white privilege and Equality, Diversity and Inclusion. Fraser pointed out that the...

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Understanding the Importance of the Intersection between Community Engagement and our Everyday Lives

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

Jay Friesen, Partnership Coordinator and Lecturer in Community Service-Learning at the University of Alberta, explored how to explicitly, rather than implicitly, explain different parts of who we are in several contexts in an art impact workshop at Congress 2021. Utilizing several videos and activities in breakout rooms, he intended to prompt participants to think more carefully about how to weave community engagement into their academic persona. 

Friesen’s interest in the intersection between community engagement and university sparked with his growing desire to avoid his life at university during his Masters at Simon Fraser. 

After a brief introduction, he began the session casually by describing different aspects of himself in order to strike a conversation with the audience on understanding themselves in relation to their...

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Getting Your Research Message Across: A Workshop

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

As part of the Career Corner series, Charity Slobod, Community Connect Lead and Professional Development Coordinator of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, and Jay Friesen, Faculty of Arts Community Service-Learning Partnership Coordinator, presented an Arts Impact Workshop entitled “So What? Who Cares?” This workshop aimed to explain how answering both the question of “So What?” and the question of “Who Cares?” is crucial to obtaining grants and scholarships for conducting your research, engaging the community with your research, or simply making it known to the world that your research matters and why it does. While normally conducted as an intensive three-hour workshop involving research pitch improvisation, this workshop was condensed into a short one-hour workshop that included audience engagement in the form of participants pitching...

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The Future of Francophone Publishing Needs Our Support

 
Congress 2021 blog edition 
 
By Megan Perram, (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studie at the University of Alberta 
 
Leading Canadian editors from across the country take on the important issue of Francophone scholarship in today’s panel titled “Le Français Dans Un Monde Scientifique Anglophone/French In An English-Dominated Academic World.” In a series of rapid talks, Canada’s leading advocates for French academic publishing discuss what it means to be a Francophone publisher in a predominantly Anglophone industry landscape.  
 
The interdisciplinary panel featured Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier, Assistant Professor at University of Victoria and Editor-in-Chief of Anthropologica, Marc-André Éthier, Professor at Université de Montréal and Editor-in-Chief of Revue des sciences de l’éducation, David Lefrançois, Professor at Université du...

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The Future of Francophone Publishing Needs Our Support

 
Congress 2021 blog edition 
 
By Megan Perram, (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studie at the University of Alberta 
 
Leading Canadian editors from across the country take on the important issue of Francophone scholarship in today’s panel titled “Le Français Dans Un Monde Scientifique Anglophone/French In An English-Dominated Academic World.” In a series of rapid talks, Canada’s leading advocates for French academic publishing discuss what it means to be a Francophone publisher in a predominantly Anglophone industry landscape.  
 
The interdisciplinary panel featured Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier, Assistant Professor at University of Victoria and Editor-in-Chief of Anthropologica, Marc-André Éthier, Professor at Université de Montréal and Editor-in-Chief of Revue des sciences de l’éducation, David Lefrançois, Professor at Université du...

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Choral Singing at the Forefront of Pandemic Adaptability

 
Congress 2021 blog edition 
 
By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 
 
We know that the arts sector has been hit particularly hard by the global COVID-19 pandemic, but as Laurier Fagnan, Professor at Campus Saint-Jean, explains, choral singing has been almost completely silenced. Near the onset of the pandemic in March of 2020, choirs were one of the many forms of gathering that became prohibited. In Fagnan’s talk “Choral Singing in a Confined Pandemic World” the Professor discusses the innovative forms of adaptability the choir community has undertaken over the past year. 
 
Choirs that were once vibrant suddenly went silent. For Fagnan, the effects of shutting down the choir singing community ran deep. The professor explains that choir members began facing mental health decline when they no...

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Deconstructing Language and Communication with Research

 

Congress 2021 edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

Intersections in Arts provides a broad, interdisciplinary framework to bring researchers together to allow voices, conversations, exhibits, and performances to resonate through a flexible format on issues that raise urgent calls for tackling social inequities, injustices, and violences. 

The University of Alberta’s Faculty of Arts segment provided a space to present research on the material conditions of culture and their intersecting conditions of race, gender and identity. 

After a brief introduction of the speakers by Marie Carriere, Xiaoting Li offered an in-depth view into her research on how human interaction is inherently multimodal.  

She briefly narrated the story of Andras Toma, a soldier in the Hungarian war, who was taken as a war prisoner in Russia. Unable to speak Russian, he was sent to a...

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Resounding Calls for Justice Regarding Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Hosted by the University of Alberta Signature Area, Intersections of Gender, the open event “MMIWG Calls for Justice; Indigenous Women on Rising Up” consisted of a series of presentations on reflections in response to the findings of the 2019 Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG).  

Presenters included Intersections of Gender Associate Director Rebecca Sockbeson, Elder Ekti Margaret Cardinal, Commissioner Michele Audette, internationally renowned Indigenous rights activist and author Winona LaDuke, President of Maskwacis Cultural College Dr. Claudine Louis, PhD Student at the University of Alberta in Indigenous Peoples Education Sarah Auger, artist and Assistant Professor in the Facutly of Extension at the University of Alberta Dr. Lana Whiskeyjack, performance artist and international advocate...

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Indigenous-led Conservation: A Pathway to Reconcile with our Indigenous Community

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

In the first of Congress 2021’s Big Thinking series, titled “Yáázǫ Kéorat’ı̨ (We see the daylight),” member of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative The Honorable Ethel Blondin-Andrew shed light on how clean water, good jobs, and active participation in diverse local economies through Indigenous-led conservation are effective pathways to healthy futures for both the land and its inhabitants. 

Blondin-Andrew, the first Indigenous woman elected to Parliament and recipient of the 2019 Maclean’s “Lifetime Achievement Award”, started her presentation by offering a rare glimpse into her life as a child.   

She described her grandmother, a healer and one of her parental figures in her childhood, as a fearless and strong matriarch who transcended gender lines and taught her the gifts of giving, receiving and serving. This...

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Listen to the Experts: How Publish and Market your Scholarly Book

 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her) - PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

At Congress 2021, there are multiple resources to supplement your scholarly work. One of them was the “Publishing and Marketing your Scholarly Book” panel hosted by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Canadian editors and marketing specialists from the country’s top scholarly presses, Pamela Holway, Stephen Shapiro and Erin Rolfs, guided their audience through the publication process beginning at how to write an effective book proposal and ending with demystifying the marketing process after your book is published.  

Stephen Shapiro, Acquisitions Editor for the University of Toronto Press, led the first presentation on how to effectively begin the process of publishing a scholarly manuscript. Shapiro insists that...

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Hope for an Unsolvable Social Injustice

 
Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her) - PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Congress 2021 has taken off with full force. On Thursday morning, opening keynote speaker Dr. Peter Mackie gave an inspiring talk highlighting how people and relations are key to ending homelessness. Dr. Mackie, Reader at Cardiff University in the School of Geography and Planning, called on his audience to consider how although homelessness may seem like an unsolvable social injustice, that there is in fact hope.  

Dr. Mackie weaved his audience through three major factors that may contribute to solving the issue around homelessness. First, we must embrace diverse knowledge and abilities from Indigenous Elders and community leaders, youth, lived experience, local and national government, academics and even celebrities. Although first line approaches may value increasing...

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Weaving Strong Cultural and Community Identity: Multimedia Exhibits on Canada’s Northern and Indigenous Communities

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Organized by the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Education, “Learning in Northern Communities, Cultures, and Places: A Multimedia Interactive Gathering with the Faculty of Education, University of Alberta” featured four arts-based and/or multimodal exhibits from Dr. Ali Shiri, Dr. Trudy Cardinal, Dr. Diane Conrad, and Dr. Melissa Tremblay. The moderator of the panel, Dr. Michael O’Driscoll, stated that the overarching theme of Canada’s Northern and Indigenous communities that unites all of these exhibits perhaps embodies the 2021 Congress’ theme of Northern Relations. 

Dr. Ali Shiri, Associate Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research (FGSR) at the University of Alberta, utilized his research on the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) in the far Northwestern Arctic region of what is now Canada to create a cultural heritage digital library system. This...

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Editing is Power: Teachings from “Indigenous Sovereignty and Editing Practices”

Congress 2021 blog edition 

Guest blog by Claire Kroening - University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Today, an esteemed panel of leaders in Indigenous scholarly editing presented in an open event. The panel included Michelle Coupal, Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and Deanna Reder. Together, they discussed their first-hand experiences of publishing Indigenous scholarly material--the challenges they faced, and the successes that came from telling Indigenous stories how they should be told--and the models they follow.  

Establishing Indigenous editing practices 

Deanna Reder began the discussion, explaining where Indigenous editing got started, and where it is going. The first established Indigenous press in the world is Theytus Books. Theytus provided academics and editors wanting to engage in Indigenous scholarship a “tremendously encouraging model.” This model served as a basis for Indigenous Editors...

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Congress 2021, Northern Relations, kicks off and makes history as the largest virtual academic conference ever hosted

Congress 2021 blog edition 

Guest blog by Claire Kroening - University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

It began with a territorial acknowledgment, a reflection on our role in truth and reconciliation, the burning of sweetgrass, and a song. The opening ceremony of Congress 2021 promised a strong commitment to its Northern Relations theme this year, which was developed by the University of Alberta in collaboration with the Federation, Indigenous students, scholars, leaders and Elders, and northern partners including Yukon University. 

Teachings for Congress 2021 

Florence Glanfield, member of the Métis Nation of Alberta and Vice-Provost (Indigenous Programming and Research) at the University of Alberta, welcomed attendees to the virtual conference and invited forth Indigenous Knowledge Holders, Dr. and Elder Francis Whiskeyjack, Elsey Gauthier and Edna Elias to lead in ceremonial...

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Les événements organisés pendant la pandémie font preuve de créativité

Dans le contexte de la pandémie de COVID-19, une nouvelle catégorie d’activités a vu le jour : les événements virtuels.

Lorsque la pandémie a frappé, les organisations qui tiennent habituellement des événements annuels – ou plus fréquents – de réseautage, d’éducation ou de salons professionnels ont dû les annuler les uns après les autres. Des entreprises technologiques avant-gardistes, telles que Forj, ont saisi l’occasion d’aider ces organisations à rester en relation avec leurs intervenants, leurs employés ou leurs membres en fournissant des plateformes qui améliorent l’accès et l’expérience des participants, et les résultats sont époustouflants.

L’un de ces exemples – et l’un des événements les plus importants et complexes pour lesquels Forj a fourni des services à ce jour – est le Congrès des sciences humaines (Congrès...

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Risques d'exposition et angoisses croissantes : Des chercheurs examinent les effets de la crise de la COVID-19 sur les travailleurs

Un certain niveau de risque est inhérent à tout milieu de travail, mais la COVID-19 a fait naître un tout nouveau type de menace. Comment ces risques sont-ils répartis au sein de la population active? Certains groupes sont-ils injustement pénalisés par leur risque d'infection ou par les effets négatifs des mesures de confinement? Les chercheurs canadiens examinent attentivement les conséquences de la pandémie sur la main-d'œuvre actuelle.

À l'Institut national de la recherche scientifique, le professeur Xavier St-Denis examine les déterminants sociodémographiques du risque professionnel d'exposition à la COVID-19 sur le milieu de travail. En raison de lacunes importantes dans les données relatives à la COVID-19 à l'échelle nationale, en particulier les données sur la population qui permettraient de comparer...

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