juin 2021

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Des chercheurs canadiens examinent les effets de l’apprentissage à distance et des changements rapides dans l’éducation

Dès qu’ils ont pris conscience que la pandémie de COVID-19 se prolongerait jusqu’au mois de septembre, les décideurs politiques et les éducateurs se sont empressés de mettre en place l’apprentissage en ligne et ont radicalement modifié les protocoles d’apprentissage en classe. Comment les parents, les élèves et les éducateurs ont-ils été touchés par ces changements? Quelles leçons pouvons-nous tirer pour orienter les adaptations à long terme en vue d’une année scolaire sûre? Les chercheurs en sciences humaines d’un bout à l’autre du pays cherchent des réponses à ces questions et bien d’autres encore.

La professeure Emma Duerden, responsable scientifique du programme de recherche sur le développement du cerveau à l’Université de Western Ontario, est une experte du développement cognitif de l’enfant. Depuis l’éclosion de la COVID-19, son équipe de recherche s’est concentrée sur l’étude des méthodes optimales d’apprentissage en ligne pour les enfants des écoles primaires de l’...

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Participation, Representation, and Trust in Racialized or Marginalized Communities as Weapons Against Systemic Racism (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Systemic racism refers to racism that is embedded in the processes, laws, and regulations of an institution. It extends beyond individual attitudes or acts of racism to encompass broader patterns of harmful or exclusionary policies and treatment of individuals. As a settler colonial state, systemic racism is deeply rooted in every institution of Canada, and continues to be upheld and reinforced to the detriment of racialized and marginalized communities. “Systemic Racism Within the Justice System,” hosted by Correctional Service Canada, called upon a panel of practitioners and advocates who accept and admit that systemic racism permeates Canada’s criminal justice system to discuss the some of the challenges involved in addressing systemic racism and propose solutions to it. Warden Gary Sears and Assistant Warden Management Services Barbara Sagh from the Edmonton Institution,...

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Erasure, Denial and Ignorance (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The “Hedging, Erasing, Absolving, and Other “EDI” Pitfalls: Recreating Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Policies, and Praxis” webcast at Congress 2021 was an open event hosted by the ReCreation Collective and University of Alberta. It featured a panel of speakers who discussed the production of EDI policy documents and frameworks and how the language of EDI can either enable or constrain significant institutional change. 

Drawing upon deeply intersectional and prefigurative methodologies and frameworks, panel members from the ReCreation Collective, a gathering of Indigenous, racialized, disabled, Muslim, 2SLGBTQIA scholars and invested practitioners, presented their research findings from a discourse analysis of 143 EDI policy documents from Canadian sport organizations.  

The findings from this research enabled...

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“We need to bring visibility to this issue” - South Ontario residents talk about the threat nuclear waste dumping proposes to their communities (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

A few years ago, the Ontario government committed to nuclear energy generation, with the promise of a thorough and safe plan for dumping nuclear waste in the province. Today, as waste mounts, so does the tension surrounding the incomplete and unsatisfactory waste management plan.  

In today’s session, “Northern Relations, Radiation and Nuclear Waste,” Ontarians talked about the pitfalls of the deep geologic repository site the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is proposing as the solution to Ontario's nuclear waste management.  

Deep geologic repository is a method of nuclear waste management where waste is buried deep underground and stored for hundreds of years as it decays. Dr. Richard Denton, Co-Chair, North America International Physicians for Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) (Nobel Peace Prize 1985)...

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Northern projects you should know about: young people lead change (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

“Northern Inspirations: A New Generation of Voices for Change” began by showcasing a variety of northern initiatives led by young voices. Here are some highlights: 

The Yukon First Nations Climate Action Fellowship is a coalition of 20 youth that is set to last for 20 months, culminating in a Yukon First Nations Climate Vision and Action Plan, to be released in 2022. The fellowship is empowering youth to tackle climate change through collaboration and learning and sharing of traditional knowledge.  

Alaska Youth for Environmental Action Program is a program developed to bring...

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How to develop a powerful and meaningful land acknowledgement (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Keith King, University of Alberta, opened the Congress 2021 land acknowledgement workshop saying “as inhabitants of the land, it's essential we explore relationships with the original peoples of this land, and to learn with the local Indigenous people.” He noted how rare it is to be in a place that doesn't have a history of colonization and occupation. When we look, we will see we are always on Indigenous land.  

Land acknowledgements are an old Indigenous tradition and protocol done to pay respect to the people and history of the lands you are situated on. Today, land acknowledgements affirm the enduring relationship between Indigenous peoples and express commitments of reconciliation.  

Teachings and quotes from Grandmother Doreen Spence 

Elder Doreen Spence of the University of Calgary spoke during the first...

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Seeding security: Community-based approaches to eradicating northern food insecurity (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Northern food insecurity is a highly complex issue. For northern communities, high degrees of isolation and poor infrastructure collide with climate change and the legacy of colonialism to challenge the sustainability of northerner’s homes and traditions.  

The major takeaway from today’s discussion on this issue is that we must reframe how we think about addressing it; we must set targets to completely eradicate the problem, and work to meet them. The end goal should be to have thriving, sustainable northern communities that are inherently food secure.  

Imagine the risk hunters take driving ATVs on the river system to get to remote hunting sites while freezing and thawing cycles are increasingly unpredictable. A resident of Peawanuck, an Indigenous Cree Community in Northern Ontario, described his experience in a...

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Resources for Indigenous-engaged scholarship and what we learned from the Career Corner session (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

“First of all, if we live and work in this place called Canada, all of us are, in some way, engaged in Indigenous scholarship because we are all situated on Indigenous lands and territories. So what is our responsibility?” Dr. Florence Glanfield, Vice-Provost (Indigenous Programming & Research) for the University of Alberta, urges scholars to acknowledge this fact and consider how they embody it in their research lives.  

When academics think about conducting Indigenous-engaged scholarship, often the first thing that comes to mind is working directly in Indigenous communities. Working in Indigenous-engaged research is both personal and centred in community because as Dr. Glanfield explained, “we exist in places, and come from places that shape who we are.” 

“Research can’t be extractive; it’s about relationality.” Dr...

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Working Towards Peace Education for All (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

In a brief but mighty keynote, Steven Staples, chairperson of Peace Quest, accomplished policy and research strategist, published author, and award-winning peace and social justice advocate discussed peace education and engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. This open event was hosted by the Canadian Peace Research Association and moderated by Frederic Pearson, Executive Director at Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, Wayne State University. The session was sponsored by Peace Quest, a leadership and education initiative that has launched an ambitious plan to engage students, teachers, and Canadians to promote peace. 

Staples outlined for the audience the details of a robust study he conducted on peace and social justice education and engagement strategies in the COVID-19 context. The policy analyst...

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Rebuilding the Institution: Concrete Steps to Support BIPoC Scholars in the Academy (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Congress 2021 is ending the way it began, with an intentional focus on engagement with justice and equity in academia. In “Beyond Equity Policy: Searching for Institutional Procedures and Practices that Support Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (Bipoc) Faculty” a panel of equity officers and academics shared insights on how to address racism and related issues that affect BIPoC faculty at Canadian universities.  

The robust panel included Jeff Denis, Associate Professor at McMaster University, Irene Shankar, Professor at Mount Royal University, Arig al Shaibah, Associate Vice-President, Equity and Inclusion and Adjunct Associate Professor at McMaster University, Aliyah Dosani, Professor at Mount Royal University, Claudine Bonner, Associate Professor at Acadia University, and Irfan Chaudhry, Equity...

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Our Future is Shared: Sheila Watt-Cloutier Presents “Everything is Connected” (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

The sixth Big Thinking session at Congress, “Everything is Connected: Environment, Economy, Foreign Policy, Sustainability, Human Rights, and Leadership in the 21st Century,” was proud to feature Sheila Watt-Cloutier, a globally renown environmental, cultural, and human rights advocate. A Nobel Peace Prize nominee (2007) for her advocacy work in demonstrating the impact of global climate change, especially in the Arctic, on human rights, Watt-Cloutier is also an Officer of the Order of Canada, and the recipient of the 2004 Aboriginal Achievement Award for Environment, the 2005 United Nations Champion of the Earth Award, the 2005 Norwegian-based Sophie Prize, the 2015 Right Livelihood Award, and the 2020 Jack P. Blaney Award for Dialogue. In this Big Thinking lecture, Watt-Cloutier asserted that all of the pressing issues of today – matters surrounding the...

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Extending Social Science Research Partnerships to Canada’s North: A Mitacs Panel - en anglais

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

Mitacs, an independent, not-for-profit organization that fosters global growth and innovation, hosted a two-part session entitled, “Developing Research Partnerships in Canada’s North – Opportunities and Challenges: How Social Sciences Can Contribute,” at Congress. The first part was available as an on-demand pre-recorded 32-minute video to watch before the live Q&A session on Thursday, June 3, 2021 that comprised the second part. The pre-recorded video examined research partnerships between Mitacs, academia, and for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. At the live Q&A session, the three panelists who were featured in the pre-recorded video spoke on their process for developing relationships during their research partnerships; their experiences working in co-construction; how they ensured that their research was driven by the needs of the community;...

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Reflecting on Historical Indigenous-Canada Relations; Building New, Healthy Relationships for the Future - en anglais

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future,” was an open event hosted by the University of Manitoba Press and moderated by their Sales and Marketing Supervisor, David Larsen. It celebrated the upcoming launch on June 8, 2021 of co-editors Katherine Graham and David Newhouse’s book by the same name, Sharing the Land, Sharing a Future, which examines the influence of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP), a report published in 1996, on Indigenous-Canada relations. With the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples laying the foundational work for subsequent milestones in Indigenous-Canada relations, Graham and Newhouse considered avenues by which we may “establish a new relationship, build healthy and powerful communities, engage citizens, and move to action.”

Professor Emeritus at Trent University Marlene Brant Castellano opened by providing...

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Addressing Burnout: Is Doing Equity Work Worth the Costs? - en anglais

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta

In an era of increasing hostility towards the incorporation of diversity, inclusion, equity, and anti-colonial policies and practices in institutional settings, “We Are Dropping Like Flies: The Professional and Physiological Implications of Doing Equity Work” an open event hosted by the Canadian Sociological Association and moderated by Associate Professor at Mount Royal University Irene Shankar, invited four social justice scholars to provide insight on the personal and professional costs of performing equity work.

PhD Candidate in Sociology at The University of British Columbia Jennifer Adkins, Director of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging at ATB Financial Roselle M. Gonsalves, Assistant Professor in Indigenous Studies at Mount Royal University Vicki Bouvier, and Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Language Revitalization and Decolonizing Education at...

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The Discrimination against Black Co-ops - en anglais

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus.

The Canadian Association for Studies in Co-operation “Racial Justice and Cooperatives” open event webcast featured a powerful presentation, organised around visual stories, by Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Professor of Community Justice and Social Economic Development, John Jay College.

Her presentation addressed ways cooperatives have been used to achieve economic democracy, racial justice and the challenges to achieving racial inclusion and racial justice in the cooperative movement in North America.

Nembhard began by detailing how North America has a history of colonialism including asset stripping, settler attitudes and the economic sabotage of Black co-ops. The White supremacists used financial sabotage to gain an excessive and unfair competition. This included and was not limited to:

  • railroads...

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Addressing White Supremacy: Anti-Racist Technologies - en anglais

Congress 2021 blog edition

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus.

The Canadian Communication Association’s “How to Make Your Technology Anti-Racist” open event webcast featured Charlton Mcllwain, Professor, Media, Culture, and Communications at NYU Alliance for Public Interest Technology.

Mcllwain recently published a book titled, “Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the Afronet to Black Lives Matter'', which focuses on the intersections of computing technology, race, inequality, and racial justice activism.

Mcllwain described his book as a historically written text narrating and connecting multiple decades of relationships between African Americans and computing technologies from a time when racial justice and computer revolutions were occurring simultaneously.

“Anti-racist technologies not only diminish the scourge of racism and white...

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Saving the Arctic: A Roundtable on Ocean Governance and Sustainability (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

The “Critical Perspectives on Arctic Oceans Governance, Sustainability, and Justice” open event, hosted by the Canadian Law and Society Association (CLSA), centered on the United Nations’ proclamation of 2021 as the beginning of a Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030) to support sustainable development of the ocean and efforts to reverse declines in ocean health. Sustainable development is often described as requiring balance between the three pillars of the economic aspect, the environmental aspect, and the social aspect. But between these three pillars, where do cross-cutting aspects like ‘equity’ and ‘justice’ fall? This roundtable event aimed to reflect on global issues of equity and justice, with regards to the Arctic Ocean specifically, but also on ocean governance and sustainability in general. 

The roundtable was moderated by Sara Seck,...

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One Land Defender on the Front Lines of Climate Justice (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

In one of the most compelling talks at this year’s Congress, Tara Houska, Tribal Attorney and Land Defender from Couchiching First Nation, discussed her incredible career fighting climate destruction at both the political and industrial levels. “Old Ways Know Best: Cultural Shift as a Solution to the Climate Crisis” was an open event hosted by the Environmental Studies Association of Canada (ESAC). 

Houska began her talk acknowledging her physical space, sitting outside in front of a body of water. She’s currently living in a pipeline resistance camp with a group of young activists. The passion and sense of justice that these young people embody inspire Houska to keep on with her fight. The climate activist described how she recently had a meeting with Joe Biden’s Senior Climate Advisor: “that...

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How to Boost Your Résumé in Ways that Work (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Positioning yourself as the best possible candidate for a job opening is a difficult but important skill to master. In an insightful lecture hosted by Mitacs, Catherine Maybrey, Career Coach at CM Coaching Services, offers valuable career-building tools, tips, and resources for enhancing your career.  

According to Maybrey, résumés are vital documents that are often misunderstood: “The résumé’s entire job is to get you to that interview stage and to keep you in the competition. That's it, the résumé is not going to get you a job.” We have to remember that our job applications must demonstrate our competence in the area being hired for and that we would be an asset to the organization. However, the interview is where we need to nuance our résumés and really stand out. 

A common misconception...

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Deconstructing the EDI Acronym with Dr. Malinda Smith (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Malinda Smith, Vice Provost Equity Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) and Professor at the University of Calgary, invites us to think about racial diversity in leadership positions in Canadian higher education, barriers to inclusivity, and solutions to our existing racial and gender inequalities. Smith’s talk, “Diversity Gap in Canadian Higher Education,” was organized by the Canadian Sociological Association and the Canadian Society for the Study of Education. 

Like most talks at Congress, this lecture began with a land acknowledgment. However, Smith called on the audience to think deeper about our complacency and participation in ongoing colonial violence. She referenced the recent discovery of 215 Indigenous children’s bodies found on the grounds of the Kamloops Indian Residential School in British...

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Combating Unconscious Bias and Systemic Racism (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Although – hopefully – most of us do not consciously or intentionally work to perpetuate inequality in the world, odds are that most of us at least sometimes say or do things that preclude diversity and exclude the ‘other.’ SAGE Publishing hosted the “Getting Real About Inequality and Unconscious Bias” open event at Congress on Tuesday, June 1, 2021. This event featured pre-recorded presentations by two contributing authors to the book, Getting Real About Race, and one contributing author to the book, Getting Real About Inequality, all of whom speak on how we can endeavour to do better in terms of addressing inequality and unconscious bias. 

The first speaker, Karen Wu, is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles, and contributed the chapter, ““I Just Think Asian Men Aren’t Sexy!”: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality, and the Devaluing...

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Making Social Work Work: Presentations on Current Research in the Field of Social Work (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

The Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE) hosted “Life Satisfaction for Disabled Youth: What Role Does Resilience Play?,” which comprised of three pre-recorded videos, each followed by a brief Q&A session, that summarized the results of some recent research that was conducted in the field of social work. 

University of Toronto Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work doctoral candidates Ran Hu and Ami Goulden presented their research on resilience, stating that “young people living with disabilities in Canada report significantly lower levels of perceived life satisfaction than their non-disabled peers.” They name ‘resilience,’ defined as “our capacity to navigate and negotiate resources that sustain our wellbeing,” as playing a significant role in narrowing the gap in life satisfaction between disabled and non-disabled young people. While meanings of...

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Let’s Talk about Inclusivity! (en anglais)

Congress 2021 edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

Social inclusion is context-dependent and calls forth a myriad of philosophical ideals. The University of Alberta’s Faculty of Nursing’s “Social Inclusion and Health Equity” webcast invited a panel of eloquent speakers and participants to discuss their views on the topic of social inclusion and its links to human rights discourses and health outcomes. Their discussions were centered around marginalization, disadvantage and exclusion.  

The webcast began with a discussion paper presentation by Edythe Andison, registered nurse with a background in geriatrics, Sherry Dahlke, Associate Professor, Faculty of Nursing, and Robin Coatsworth-Puspoky, a Nursing PhD candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in geriatric mental health. They looked at how, as nurses, they can transcend geographical age boundaries, race,...

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Becoming Your Own Best Critic: How to Edit Your Own Work (en anglais)


Congress 2021 blog edition 
 
By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 
 
Many of you are likely familiar with the difficulties of editing your own writing. When reading over your own work, your brain has a tendency to make sense of what you think is on the page, rather than what is actually there, thus letting mistakes and inefficient writing pass by unnoticed. It is hard to edit your own writing. And it does not help that some of the most valuable – and obvious – strategies for editing your own writing are also, unfortunately, difficult to put into practice. Strategies like waiting a few weeks between drafting and editing, filling the time in between with a lot of other reading and writing, are simply not possible if you have a hard deadline to submit your work by. Alternatively, having a trusted friend or colleague look over your writing, or even hiring a professional editor, might also be impractical...

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How Social Meaning Constructs a Narrative of Adolescent Suicide Clusters (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Trigger warning: This blog post discusses suicide in youth. 

How do we create the social meanings surrounding youth and suicide? This is a question Seth Abrutyn, Associate Professor at The University of British Columbia, is seeking to explore. Abrutyn begins his talk by calling into question the current methodological and theoretical directions of his home discipline, sociology, in terms of studying modern suicide. Suicide, particularly in young people, has never been more salient in our discourse and critical consciousness. Young people are evidently suffering, and one of the phenomena coming out of this tragedy is suicide clusters. 

Abrutyn argues that the issue of suicide clusters, particularly in high schools, is escalating, however we know very little about how they function and...

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Reimagining the World through Disability Arts and Justice (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

In the fourth panel of the Big Thinking series at Congress, audience members were treated to an invigorating lecture-performance by Alice Sheppard, the Artistic Director of Kinetic Light. Kinetic Light is a project-based ensemble working at the intersections of disability, dance, design, identity, and technology to create transformative art and advance the intersectional disability arts movement. 

The most striking element of “Disability Will (re)...

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Translating research into documentary, and documentary into impact (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Documentaries are a tremendous vehicle for academics to communicate their research to the public, popularize their ideas, and make impactful social change. They make knowledge accessible...Rather than let valuable research sit on a shelf, behind a journal paywall, or even locked in an academic vernacular that only a handful of people understand, documentaries translate and deliver evidence to audiences to make a real impact.  

How can you translate your research into documentary format? Panellists from “Show, Don’t Tell: Breaking Bottlenecks Between Evidence and Impact Via Documentary” suggest building two things: 1) relationships with broadcasters, media and producers; and 2) a solid pitch for the story your research tells. 

Click Your Own Adventure Activity: following Tim Fox’s story  

Today’s session...

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Rethinking the contemporary university: possibilities for decolonization (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Today’s session “Examining Anti-Racist and Decolonial Possibilities in the Contemporary University” delivered a variety of perspectives from academics around the globe, on whether possibilities to decolonize contemporary university systems exist, and what anti-racist work in universities looks like.  

Dr. Breitner Tavares of the Universidade de Brasília began the panel by discussing his paper "The Importance of Affirmative Action for Black Students as a Strategy Against Mental Illness and Suicide in Brazilian Universities."  

The social inequalities between white Brazilians and Black Brazilians overtime have manifested in different ways within Brazilian academia. First, it was in student numbers: very few Black students attended universities when they were established. Then, as more Black Brazilians...

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Bridging the gaps in employability for social science and humanities academics (en anglais)

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

“We have an underutilization of talent in Canada; we produce exceptional [social science and humanities] graduates, but don’t do a great job hiring them,” said Gail Bowkett, member of The/La Collaborative and panellist in today’s discussion on bridging employment gaps for SSH grads. Indeed, the Canadian landscape of work is saturated with employers who want university-educated employees, and university grads who remain locked out of public and private sector employment due to a perceived lack of ‘skills’ and ‘experience’. 

Members of The/La Collaborative discussed how to address this problem by transforming the ways we build talent, capacity and employability in SSH students and how to do so while preserving the research integrity and foundational knowledge of the disciplines. The discussion centred around their 2021 report,...

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Pulling Back the Curtains: Unveiling Untold Stories in Canada’s History (en anglais)


Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

Hosted by the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE), the “On the Other Side(s) of 150 Book Launch” open event celebrated the launch of the book, On the Other Side(s) of 150: Untold Stories and Critical Approaches to History, Literature, and Identity in Canada

The co-editors of the book, Bishop’s University Professor Linda Morra and Simon Fraser University Assistant Professor Sarah Henzi, were both present at the panel. According to Morra, untold stories have the power to both nuance and complicate existing stories. “Our book is located in a research trajectory that reveals how there’s so much more work to be done in terms of what is yet hidden or covered up,” said Henzi. 

Morra and Henzi were joined by the following contributors to the book: Deanna Reder, Simon Fraser University; Alix Shield, Simon...

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Let’s Imagine What’s Possible and Transform Our Universities from Within to Enable Indigenous Scholarship

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Universities are human-made, so with willpower and a commitment from administration and faculty, universities can be transformed from within to reflect and support Indigenous knowledge, consciousness and tradition. As moderator President of Vancouver Island University Dr. Deborah Saucier noted, the panel discussion “Enabling Indigenous Scholarship in Canadian Higher Education” gave everyone who attended “much to chew on.”   

Panelist Dr. Frank Deer of the University of Manitoba told a story of a young Indigenous student who desperately wanted to ‘see herself’ at her university; however, the climate and culture didn’t provide the space for her, nor was she given support. Dr. Florence Glanfield, Vice-Provost, Indigenous Programming & Research, University of Alberta, echoed this experience saying when she was a young...

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Art as a Ceremony

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The Canadian Association of University Teachers of German’s “Decolonizing Begins with Spirit” open event webcast featured a powerful presentation, organised around visual stories, by Lana Whiskeyjack, Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Alberta & Multidisciplinary Treaty. 

Whiskeyjack confessed that growing up, she was disconnected from her Indigenous Cree Creation stories, ceremonies, songs and laws. Through the residential school era, many Indigenous people were forcefully assimilated into the Canadian culture. According to her, due to the trauma from the Indian residential schools, many of her relatives had wounded spirits and this trauma led some of her relatives to raise their children with the same abuses they had endured. She concluded that the two historical events that had...

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The Art of Make Believe: A Panel on Make Believe: The Secret Library of M. Prud’homme – A Rare Collection of Fakes

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

The Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) hosted the “Creative Writing Panel: Make Believe” open event, a roundtable discussion centered around Make Believe: The Secret Library of M. Prud’homme – A Rare Collection of Fakes. Made possible through a one-time Canada Council New Chapter Grant, this “special collection of fakes and forgeries” was co-curated by Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Dalhousie Heather Jessup and Assistant Professor cross-appointed in the Faculty of Information and the Department of English at the University of Toronto Claire Battershill. They were joined by the following four speakers: Sheryda Warrener, poet and lecturer in the School of Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia; Lindsay Cuff, Assistant Professor of Teaching in the Faculty of...

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Notes from A Celebration of Northern Authors

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Tlicho author Richard Van Camp led a celebration of northern authors in a reading session at Congress. Here, leading Indigenous writers and artists discussed the inspirations for their work and shared excerpts from their published and upcoming pieces.  

Tanya Roach, Inuit writer and throat singer  

“I’ve written since I learned to write my own name,” said Tanya Roach.  

The reading Roach shared came from a story about finding light in darkness. She explained she found her inspiration for the story when a blackout event in her city of Yellowknife led her to reflect on how her northern ancestors maintained light through long, black winters.  

She said the blackout was a humbling experience because she was forced to grapple with her fear of the darkness, and what her fear was telling her. “Learning how to...

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Announcing the Final Five Winners of the 2020 SSHRC Storytellers Competition

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) announced their Final Five winners of the 2020 Storytellers competition, selected from the 25 finalists who moved forward in this latest edition. This panel included lively presentations of the stories of research from the five winners. Congratulations to Noah Schwartz from Carleton University, Leïla Mostefa-Kara from The Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Oriane Morriet from Université de Montréal, Joanie Caron from The Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, and Sydney Seidel from the University of Calgary. Additionally, a special congratulations to the winner of the 2020 Storytellers Engagement Prize: Lee Beavington from Simon Fraser University. 

As Ted Hewitt, SSHRC President, took the virtual stage to acknowledge the competition...

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How to Get SSHRC Funding: Tips and Advice on the Granting Process

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Representatives from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Sébastien Cadieux, Nadine May, and Julia Warnes, came together to detail the variety of funding opportunities available for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in Canada. The panel focused on outlining the different funding streams for masters, doctoral and postdoctoral candidates, advice on how to navigate the application process, and helpful tips on preparing a strong application. 

Julia Warnes kicked off the panel detailing some changes to funding applications that we can expect in the coming year: “starting this year, all SSHRC doctoral and postdoctoral award applicants will be required to indicate as part of a new application module, whether diversity considerations are applicable to their proposed research...

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Taking on Anti-Oppression through Interdisciplinary Research

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram (she/her), PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

In an interdisciplinary feminist panel, hosted by the Canadian Sociological Association (CSA), speakers explore difficult and important issues of settler colonialism responsibility, the gendered implications of colonial violence, Black resistance to ongoing white supremacy, and violence against disabled women. A stand out aspect of the “Bridging Divides, Building Solidarity for Change: Feminists Confronting Colonialism, Anti-Black Racism and Patriarchy” panel is its centreing of new scholars and PhD students doing exceptional work in anti-oppression.  

The first speaker, Sheri McConnell, Assistant Professor at Memorial University, focused her talk on a call for collective reckoning with the responsibilities of settler colonialism. McConnell structured her talk in a series of powerful queries to...

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Building Antiracist Capacity in Universities - What we learned from Ibram X. Kendi’s Big Thinking Discussion

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Claire Kroening, University of Alberta human geography alumna and communications professional 

Being “not-racist” is not enough to eradicate racism, social inequities and injustices. As Dr. Ibram X. Kendi’s Big Thinking discussion pressed upon attendees: for radical change we must be antiracist...in our thoughts, policies and actions.  

Defining “racism,” “racist,” and “antiracist” 

Racism is inherently structural and describes a system of prejudice and inequality. Racist is a descriptor for a single thing: a policy, a person, a statement.  

Something that is antiracist firmly and unequivocally opposes something that is racist. “There is no neutrality between racism and anti-racism,” explained Dr. Kendi.  

Race is an idea: false notions are systematically and relentlessly taught to people 

Racist ideas are reproduced over time. Dr. Kendi gave the...

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Looking at Racism from a Broader Perspective

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

The Canadian Sociological Association’s “Anti-Asian Racism during the COVID-19 Pandemic” open event webcast explored the rapid and ferocious rise in racism fueled by the spread of COVID-19 around the globe. The panel, including Xiaobei Chen (Carleton University), Cary Wu (York University) and Hijin Park (Brock University), clarified the particularities of anti-Asian racism and its impact on their sense of safety and well-being during the pandemic. Further, they analysed the positionality of Asians in the politics of anti-racism and how it ought to be understood in the context of anti-Black racism, North American settler colonialism, and colonialisms and imperialisms in the Asia Pacific. 

Xiaobei Chen, a university professor well-versed in research on racism, colonialism and multiculturalism, started her presentation...

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